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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    perfect continuous tense

    Hi there,
    Why did the writer use perfect continuous tense instead of the simple future for future action in the following sentence? Does it make a difference if the simple future tense?

    We will be closing our dedication ceremony with a burial of a time capsule.

    Tks
    pete

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    #2

    Re: perfect continuous tense

    It's actually a future progressive, not a perfect continuous, but its use here serves to indicate a clear intention to perform a future action. Essentially it's a slightly more formal equivalent of 'we are going to...'.

    Additionally, like any progressive tense-form, it may also serve to relate the action to a specific point in (here, future) time.

  2. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: perfect continuous tense

    Hi there,
    Tks a lot.
    Any difference between 'continuous' and 'progressive'? I have learned from my grammar school that it is a perfect continuous tense. I thought they refer to the same thing.

    tks
    pete

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    #4

    Re: perfect continuous tense

    Yes, 'progressive' and 'continuous' are synonymous terms in grammar for any verb phrase containing the structure [(be) Ving]. Although both are in common use, I personally favour the former because I consider that it more accurately conveys the sense of this tense-form, i.e. of an action/event already in progress at the time of reference.

    A present perfect progressive verb phrase would be e.g. the underlined part of

    He has been living here for ten years.

    A future perfect progressive verb phrase would be e.g. that of

    He will have been working here for ten years by the time he retires next July.

    'Will be -ing', as in your sentence, contains no perfective elements ([have Ved]) but is, as stated, a future progressive/continuous VP.

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