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    #1

    present perfect and perfect progressive

    i am English learner
    ' ' '
    hello
    i get confused in using perfect and perfect continuous in present ......
    is there any rule that i should follow it

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: present perfect and perfect progressive

    Quote Originally Posted by jon2010 View Post
    i am English learner
    ' ' '
    hello
    i get confused in using perfect and perfect continuous in present ......
    is there any rule that i should follow it
    The present perfect is used to express an action started in the past and completed at the time of telling.
    Example: I have read this book today.(Reading action completed)
    The Present Perfect Continuous is used to show an action started in the past and continuing up till now
    Example: I have been reading this book since morning/three hours .(Reading action continuing)

    The Present Perfect Continuous is also used to show an action started in the past and may or may not be continuing now
    Example: .I have been reading this book for the whole afternoon .(Reading action may or may not be continuing))

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: present perfect and perfect progressive

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    The present perfect is used to express an action started in the past and completed at the time of telling.
    Example: I have read this book today.(Reading action completed)
    T
    You can't use a specific time reference with the present perfect, you could say: 'I have read this book. I read it today. Or simply use the simple past: 'I read this book today'.

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    #4

    Re: present perfect and perfect progressive

    I’m not a teacher.

    Hi jon2010,

    Here a few word concerning the matter in question:

    The Present Perfect denotes a completed action while with the Present Perfect Continuous Exclusive there is an implication of incompleteness.

    He has made some experiments.
    He has been making experiments.
    Why are your lips black?
    I have been eating blackberries.
    I have eaten a whole plateful.
    She is walking up and down the room thinking of the letter she has been writing and wondering how she should finish it.
    She is going to post the letter she has just written.

    Regards,

    V.


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    #5

    Re: present perfect and perfect progressive

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    The present perfect is used to express an action started in the past and completed at the time of telling.
    Example: I have read this book today.(Reading action completed)
    The Present Perfect Continuous is used to show an action started in the past and continuing up till now
    Example: I have been reading this book since morning/three hours .(Reading action continuing)

    The Present Perfect Continuous is also used to show an action started in the past and may or may not be continuing now
    Example: .I have been reading this book for the whole afternoon .(Reading action may or may not be continuing))

    Okay, well, I can use your example sentences to show one of the differences between the present perfect and the present perfect progressive.

    I have read this book. - This does not mean that the action is contuing up until now. This action is complete. It is strictly a past action. A speaker would use the present perfect to speak of a past action that is complete but still relevant now - at present.

    I've been reading this book. - This action is not complete and continues up until now. We understand, however, that this action is not continuously ongoing. It starts and stops. One could also say, "I'm reading this book". This would have the same meaning as "I've been reading this book", with the difference being that the present perfect progressive recognizes that the action clearly started in the past and continues now. We can assume with the present progressive that the action started in the past even though it is clearly stated as it is when we use the present perfect progressive.

    Joe's been reading all morning. - In this sentence it is likely that Joe is reading at the time someone says this, and it's likely that the action started at a time in the morning and continues up until now, or up until the speaker states, "Joe's been reading all morning."

    We don't use a specific time reference with the present perfect to indicate when an action is complete or no longer ongoing. We use the past for this.

    Another way to use the present perfect is when we see evidence that an action is recent but no longer continues.

    It's been raining. - It's not raining now, but the grass is very wet.

    It's been raining a lot this summer. - It's not raining now, but we know that there have been many rainy days this summer.

    You look so tired. Have you been working all night? The listener looks tired, which would make it seem to the speaker he or she has spent the whole night working.

    It should be noted that we don't always use or need the present perfect progressive to indicate that an action is ongoing. The meaning of the verb in combination with other words can show this.

    We've been awake all night. - continuing or ongoing state or condition - Be is a stative verb, but is used as a present progressive verb to indicate temporary states. Why are you being so impolite? Why are you so impolite? The former is temporary, while the latter indicates something more permanent.

    We've lived here for just a few months. - continuing or ongoing state or condition - The verb "live" is not strictly speaking a stative verb, but the action it represents is a state. The verb "live" is often used as a progressive verb. One would just as well say, "We've been living here for just a few months".

    We've known about this for quite a while now. - continuing or ongoing state

    I've taught them for two years. - This is the present perfect. The ongoing or continuing nature of the action of teaching is indicated with the time adverbial "for two years". It is not absolutely necessary to use a progressive form to show that an action is or was ongoing, nor that it becomes ongoing in the future. Time adverbs can easily be an indication of that which is ongoing or not ongoing.
    Last edited by PROESL; 07-Aug-2009 at 17:19.

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