Results 1 to 7 of 7
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #1

    noun as adjective

    Are these sentences correct:


    1-I am a human first, then a soldier.
    2-I am human first, then soldier.

    3-I am a teacher first, then a soldier.
    4-I am teacher first, then soldier.

  1. Soup's Avatar
    VIP Member
    English Teacher
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • China

    • Join Date: Sep 2007
    • Posts: 5,882
    #2

    Re: noun as adjective

    The structure you're looking for is as follows, I am a teacher first, (and) a soldier second. (Words in brackets are optional.)

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #3

    Re: noun as adjective

    Soldier is a noun, human is an adjective that can be used as a noun (as many can). "I am a human first" and "I am human first" both are fine, but soldier requires the article.

  3. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #4

    Re: noun as adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Soldier is a noun, human is an adjective that can be used as a noun (as many can). "I am a human first" and "I am human first" both are fine, but soldier requires the article.
    I don't think it does in this case.

    Here are some examples:
    A: Are you the family cook?
    B: Cook? I am cook, cleaner, caretaker, psychologist .... You name it.


    C: Are you a plumber?
    D: I'm more handyman than plumber.


    I am more teacher than soldier. (Odd, I agree, since there's no relation there).
    I am learner first, and teacher second. In my dialect, this is a good sentence.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Armenian
      • Home Country:
      • Iran
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Nov 2002
    • Posts: 2,554
    #5

    Re: noun as adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I don't think it does in this case.

    Here are some examples:
    A: Are you the family cook?
    B: Cook? I am cook, cleaner, caretaker, psychologist .... You name it.

    C: Are you a plumber?
    D: I'm more handyman than plumber.

    I am more teacher than soldier. (Odd, I agree, since there's no relation there).
    I am learner first, and teacher second. In my dialect, this is a good sentence.
    Hi Raymott,

    What would the plural of this sentence be (ir it has one):

    I am learner first, and teacher second.

    Would it be:
    A-We are learner first, and teacher second.
    B-We are learners first, and teachers second.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia

    • Join Date: Jun 2008
    • Posts: 24,091
    #6

    Re: noun as adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    Hi Raymott,

    What would the plural of this sentence be (ir it has one):

    I am learner first, and teacher second.

    Would it be:
    A-We are learner first, and teacher second.
    B-We are learners first, and teachers second.
    B.
    But this is not problematic, since "We are learners" would not raise the objections that "I am learner" does.
    Note that you can only use this singular form without the article in formulaic sentences such as we are discussing here.

  5. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #7

    Re: noun as adjective

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I don't think it does in this case.

    Here are some examples:
    A: Are you the family cook?
    B: Cook? I am cook, cleaner, caretaker, psychologist .... You name it.


    C: Are you a plumber?
    D: I'm more handyman than plumber.


    I am more teacher than soldier. (Odd, I agree, since there's no relation there).
    I am learner first, and teacher second. In my dialect, this is a good sentence.
    I agree those sound okay but I feel they are telegraphic speech, and not representative of any rules save the rules for chopping locutions down to their shortest possible forms. Which is common in Aus. but less so elsewhere. It also seems to work best only under direct comparison with other metiers.

    To me, "then soldier" fails because it is ambiguous, soldier also being a verb.


    ADDENDUM:

    Returning to the point: "I am human" is just as good as "I am a human," but "I am soldier" taken alone, doesn't work in the way that "Je suis soldat" does in French. "I am soldier" is incorrect, taken alone.
    Last edited by konungursvia; 10-Aug-2009 at 14:22.

Similar Threads

  1. Red -- predicate adjective or predicate noun? Or both? (previous post)
    By donnach in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-May-2008, 14:51
  2. noun as adjective
    By b1ffyi59 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 04-Apr-2008, 07:08
  3. sentence structure question
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2008, 10:53
  4. An attributive adjective or noun?
    By Tomasz Klimkiewicz in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 05-Oct-2004, 10:30
  5. Red -- predicate adjective or predicate noun? Or both?
    By Lucky in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 29-Sep-2004, 16:13

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •