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    #1

    A question

    While we hear native speakers of American English saying some words like bitter,butter with /d/ sound instead of /t/ sound, we don't find that in dictionaries which support American pronunciation like Longman OR Cmbridge.......... Why??????

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: A question

    Quote Originally Posted by fuadha View Post
    While we hear native speakers of American English saying some words like bitter,butter with /d/ sound instead of /t/ sound, we don't find that in dictionaries which support American pronunciation like Longman OR Cmbridge.......... Why??????
    As far as I'm aware, it's because the pronunciation is taken as more of a regional variation on the "correct" pronunciation. A "t" is pronounced "t", not like a "d".

    Otherwise, you would have to incorporate every possible pronunciation of every word from all parts of the world.

    In the UK, for instance, the word "bath" can be pronounced in 2 (if not more) very distinct ways. The pronunciation given in dictionaries, I believe is the one which could be said to sound like "barth". However, a large number of regional accents would pronounce it with the short "a", as in "bat" but with an h at the end.

  2. Soup's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: A question

    Quote Originally Posted by fuadha View Post
    While we hear native speakers of American English saying some words like bitter,butter with /d/ sound instead of /t/ sound, we don't find that in dictionaries which support American pronunciation like Longman OR Cambridge...
    Ah, but the rule is simple. See and practice here, Improve Your American English Accent, page 18 .

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