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  1. Lacretstreet's Avatar

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    #1

    Smile Iam in doubt ...again...

    Is there any difference in meaning or, in connotation, or in the message in these two sentences?
    a-I like dancing.
    b-I like to dance.
    , because my teacher says they are exactly the same, but I think there is a difference in connotation.
    Thanks a lot

  2. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Iam in doubt ...again...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lacretstreet View Post
    Is there any difference in meaning or, in connotation, or in the message in these two sentences?
    a-I like dancing.
    b-I like to dance.
    , because my teacher says they are exactly the same, but I think there is a difference in connotation.
    Thanks a lot
    Your teacher is right that they do, or can, mean the same thing.

    However, "I like dancing" could be taken to mean that you like to watch other people dancing. It is not absolutely specific about who it refers to . When you say "I like to dance" it clearly means you. "I like dancing" could mean that you like to do it, or it's just something that exists, that you happen to like.

  3. Lacretstreet's Avatar

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    #3

    Question Re: Iam in doubt ...again...

    Thanks a lot….so… may I assume that the same idea is applied to all verbs? …I mean the difference between to or ing is applied to all verbs… or, is that the general rule….for example.
    a-I prefer playing soccer
    b-I prefer to play soccer

    c-I want to eat outside
    d-I want eating outside

    e-I need to take more classes
    d-I need taking more classes

    Is the explanation you wrote applied in all these cases?...or is there a general rule?
    Thanks a lot for your time.

  4. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Iam in doubt ...again...

    Quote Originally Posted by Lacretstreet View Post
    Thanks a lot….so… may I assume that the same idea is applied to all verbs? …I mean the difference between to or ing is applied to all verbs… or, is that the general rule….for example.
    a-I prefer playing soccer
    b-I prefer to play soccer

    c-I want to eat outside
    d-I want eating outside

    e-I need to take more classes
    d-I need taking more classes

    Is the explanation you wrote applied in all these cases?...or is there a general rule?
    Thanks a lot for your time.
    No, the example I gave works with "to like" but not necessarily everything else.

    In your first example above, with I prefer, your 2 sentences mean the same because you have specifically said "playing soccer". If you said "I prefer soccer" that could mean you like playing or watching.

    Example d does not exist. You can't say "I want eating....."
    Same goes for "I need taking more classes."

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