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      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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    #1

    "your training"

    Hello, teachers.
    I have a very basic question about the usage of possessive pronoun. I came across the following passage in a novel:
    ==========
    “You sing well,” he said, “and with a little training should sing very well indeed. How do you come to be here? You ought to do better than this; if I were you, I would not sing in such company.”
    She looked at him angrily.
    “How do I come to be here? How do you come to be here? If I had a little training, I should sing better, and if I had your training, Mr Sharnall”—and she brought out his name with a sneering emphasis—“I should not be here at all, drinking myself silly in a place like this.”
    ==========
    My question is: does the phrase "your training" here mean
    (a) training from you (that is, "if I received musical training from you")
    or
    (b) the same training as you had received at school, home, etc.?
    I appreciate your comments very much.

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jun 2008
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    #2

    Re: "your training"

    Quote Originally Posted by imchongjun View Post
    Hello, teachers.
    I have a very basic question about the usage of possessive pronoun. I came across the following passage in a novel:
    ==========
    “You sing well,” he said, “and with a little training should sing very well indeed. How do you come to be here? You ought to do better than this; if I were you, I would not sing in such company.”
    She looked at him angrily.
    “How do I come to be here? How do you come to be here? If I had a little training, I should sing better, and if I had your training, Mr Sharnall”—and she brought out his name with a sneering emphasis—“I should not be here at all, drinking myself silly in a place like this.”
    ==========
    My question is: does the phrase "your training" here mean
    (a) training from you (that is, "if I received musical training from you")
    or
    (b) the same training as you had received at school, home, etc.?
    I appreciate your comments very much.
    It means the training that Mr Sharnall had. For example, maybe he is a lawyer, and he is "drowning his sorrows" at this place. The singer is saying that if she had had Mr Sharnall's advantages, she wouldn't have to be there.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Aug 2007
    • Posts: 158
    #3

    Re: "your training"

    Thank you for your clear explanation.

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