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    #1

    Slammed

    What means slammed in this sentence?
    Well, my whole next week is slammed.


    Maybe that he won't have time, that he will be very busy next week?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by 8Julieth8 View Post
    What means slammed in this sentence?
    Well, my whole next week is slammed.


    Maybe that he won't have time, that he will be very busy next week?
    Maybe this is American English, I have never heard/seen it.


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    #3

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Maybe this is American English, I have never heard/seen it.
    Yes, it's definetely American English. It's from one American film. The man and the woman are discusing about their appointment next week. So the man apologize her that all his next week is slammed.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by 8Julieth8 View Post
    Yes, it's definetely American English. It's from one American film. The man and the woman are discusing about their appointment next week. So the man apologize her that all his next week is slammed.
    I'd say it means definition 2. in the below:
    Urban Dictionary: slammed
    If you're going to watch American films it's worth putting this dictionary under your bookmarks.

  3. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Slammed

    I find the Urban Dictionary worthless - anyone can add to it, and many people do just to be idiots. 95% of the meanings I've seen there are not used by anyone I've ever met.

    It just means his week is going to be extremely busy, without much free time at all.

    I was slammed my last two weeks myself.

    This one is so common I don't even consider it slang or jargon.

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I find the Urban Dictionary worthless - anyone can add to it, and many people do just to be idiots. 95% of the meanings I've seen there are not used by anyone I've ever met.

    It just means his week is going to be extremely busy, without much free time at all.

    I was slammed my last two weeks myself.

    This one is so common I don't even consider it slang or jargon.
    So, isn't that the definition I found from the Urban Dictionary?
    I agree that anyone can add to it, but that's the case for this forum as well. Does that mean UsingEnglish.com is worthless?
    I agree you have to read that dictionary critically, and it might not be an easy task for learners.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Slammed

    If I recall, it was used transitively, but whatever, it was close enough.

    Mostly I warn against the Urban Dictionary because no learner can tell what is a valid definition actually in use by real people and what was put in there because someone could make up a definition and put it in.

    Don't be deliberately argumentative, please. There is quality control here in this forum. There is NONE in the Urban Dictionary.

    And for the record, I am heartily sick and tired of your continued comments about how barbaric the use of English is in the US. Your post about watching American films was lacking only a "God save you, and I hope you know what you're doing, your poor, misguided soul" finish.

    Don't bother replying. I have no intention of reading.

  6. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I find the Urban Dictionary worthless - anyone can add to it, and many people do just to be idiots. 95% of the meanings I've seen there are not used by anyone I've ever met.

    It just means his week is going to be extremely busy, without much free time at all.

    I was slammed my last two weeks myself.

    This one is so common I don't even consider it slang or jargon.
    Thanks for the information, I had never heard of it. It would seem to be similar to 'crammed' in BrE.

  7. Raymott's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Slammed

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    If I recall, it was used transitively, but whatever, it was close enough.

    Mostly I warn against the Urban Dictionary because no learner can tell what is a valid definition actually in use by real people and what was put in there because someone could make up a definition and put it in.

    Don't be deliberately argumentative, please. There is quality control here in this forum. There is NONE in the Urban Dictionary.

    And for the record, I am heartily sick and tired of your continued comments about how barbaric the use of English is in the US. Your post about watching American films was lacking only a "God save you, and I hope you know what you're doing, your poor, misguided soul" finish.

    Don't bother replying. I have no intention of reading.
    This reply is not for Barb, since she's not reading. It's for the benefit of others. I feel she is being overly defensive about this. I'm not the one who has been posting all these British vs American English threads, and when I do reply to them, I do not denigrate American English. (I'm open to correction on this). There are differences, and I don't mind pointing them out when they exist. It's learners who keep asking.

    There is absolutely no question that there is a lot of American slang in American movies. The words she is putting into my mouth, of course, do not belong there. I have never called American English barbaric (If anyone can find a post in which I have stated anything like this, do not hesitate to post it, and I will apologise). The inference she makes above is entirely unwarranted. I'm disappointed that she would descend to shooting the messenger like this.

    I watch American movies myself, I enjoy them, and I have used the Urban Dictionary often with good results. I can repeat, learners, that if you watch contemporary American popular films, you will need to understand a great deal of American slang. This also applies to Australian movies and Australian slang - but we don't make as many movies.

    I hope Barb can continue to contribute with the meanings of such American slang terms (or idiomatic terms, if they aren't slang) without descending into personal attacks like this.

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