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    #1

    prepare for sth

    Prepare for the worst in advance and you won't be disappointed.

    I doubt the correctness of the 'prepare for' in this sentence. Would 'Be prepared for' be more suitable? And how about 'Be ready for'?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.
    Last edited by joham; 11-Aug-2009 at 01:06. Reason: one sentence added.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: prepare for sth

    They're all okay, but "in advance" is redundant, as preparation is always in advance.


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    #3

    Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    They're all okay, but "in advance" is redundant, as preparation is always in advance.
    I wouldn't say that preparation is always in advance, so I don't one can be absolutely certain that the poster's sentence is redundant.

    We're going to be late! Come on - let's go! You should have started preparing for the costume party in advance. Now you're just getting ready, and we're going to be late if you don't hurry. You should learn to do things in advance and not wait until the last minute.

    I think there are a number of things for which people must prepare in advance but wait until it becomes absolutely necessary to prepare.

    I have to prepare for the history test tomorrow. I should have been preparing for this test weeks ago. Now I have to study - prepare myself - for this test all night so that I can pass and not fail the course. This is the final exam! I always wait until the last minute to prepare! I have to start preparing in advance.


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    #4

    Smile Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Prepare for the worst in advance and you won't be disappointed.

    I doubt the correctness of the 'prepare for' in this sentence. Would 'Be prepared for' be more suitable? And how about 'Be ready for'?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.
    The verb-preposition combination "prepare for" is correct.

    "Prepare for the worst in advance"

    If one is not prepared in advance for an event, it's still possible to prepare. However, most of the time we think of "preparing" as something that comes before an event, or in advance.

    One could prepare at the last minute. Preparing at the last minute is not preparing in advance. Nonetheless, it is preparing - or getting ready.

    We should have prepared some food for our guests earlier. Now we have to rush out to the store to buy some things in order to prepare lunch at the last minute. We should have prepared in advance, but we didn't. Now we have to go shopping in order to prepare something. You go to the store, and I'll wait here in case they are arrive, and they probably will.


  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I wouldn't say that preparation is always in advance, so I don't [sic] one can be absolutely certain that the poster's sentence is redundant.

    We're going to be late! Come on - let's go! You should have started preparing for the costume party in advance. Now you're just getting ready, and we're going to be late if you don't hurry. You should learn to do things in advance and not wait until the last minute.

    I think there are a number of things for which people must prepare in advance but wait until it becomes absolutely necessary to prepare.

    I have to prepare for the history test tomorrow. I should have been preparing for this test weeks ago. Now I have to study - prepare myself - for this test all night so that I can pass and not fail the course. This is the final exam! I always wait until the last minute to prepare! I have to start preparing in advance.
    I suppose you are interpreting "in advance" as meaning "well ahead of the last possible moment." I took it to mean "beforehand" without the "well ahead" sense you seem to assume.

    Prepare has the prefix "pre-" meaning before, or in advance, and you can't prepare for something after it has happened. Try getting married, for instance.


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    #6

    Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I suppose you are interpreting "in advance" as meaning "well ahead of the last possible moment." I took it to mean "beforehand" without the "well ahead" sense you seem to assume.

    Prepare has the prefix "pre-" meaning before, or in advance, and you can't prepare for something after it has happened. Try getting married, for instance.
    I didn't say one could prepare for something after it has happened, and I didn't say it has to be well in advance. We usually prepare for something with enough time in order to not be rushed and to prepare properly.

    Most of us try to be prepared "in advance". However, if we are not prepared in advance, we still have to, and can, prepare for something at the moment, or very close to the moment, that the event for which we need to prepare has arrived. Sometimes, however, one can only prepare in advance, and not upon the arrival of an event for which one should have prepared earlier, and this would not necessarily be "much earlier" or "well in advance", but just in advance.

    If one is not prepared in advance for an event, it's still possible to prepare. However, most of the time we think of "preparing" as something that comes before an event, or in advance. We would still have to prepare for an event that is soon to be upon us, and this would not be considered preparing in advance. It would, nonetheless, mean that we have to prepare. It's possible to prepare for something and not conceive of this preparation as being in advance, despite the meaning of the prefix "pre".
    Last edited by PROESL; 11-Aug-2009 at 17:05. Reason: left out a word - mistake

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: prepare for sth

    Again, that's logically impossible. You can't prepare for something at the moment it occurs. That's not preparation, because you haven't done anything in advance to get ready.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by joham View Post
    Prepare for the worst in advance and you won't be disappointed.

    I doubt the correctness of the 'prepare for' in this sentence. Would 'Be prepared for' be more suitable? And how about 'Be ready for'?

    Could I ask native speakers to help me please? Thank you in advance.
    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Again, that's logically impossible. You can't prepare for something at the moment it occurs. That's not preparation, because you haven't done anything in advance to get ready.
    I agree that 'in advance' is redundant in the sentence. 'Well in advance' would be ok, it adds something; 'in advance' does not.


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    #9

    Re: prepare for sth

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Again, that's logically impossible. You can't prepare for something at the moment it occurs. That's not preparation, because you haven't done anything in advance to get ready.
    One can prepare for something very close to the moment that it is going to occur, and this would not be considered preparing in advance. In such a situation, one could say "You should have prepared in advance.", which is a clearer statement of what one means than simply saying "You should have prepared", which would seem to imply that if one did not prepare one is no longer able to prepare. One can prepare at the last moment that an event is about to take place, which is not in advance, or one can prepare in advance.

    Many well-spoken native English speakers use this phrase. I would therefore say that an ESL learner already has enough incorrect items to be concerned with, and, in my opinion, I don't think that pointing out redundancy in "prepare in advance" is going to do much to help, especially in spoken language. If one uses the phrase, I would highly doubt that one's speech would be marked as poor even by the most observant language critics. On the other hand, there are, of course, obvious cases of redundancy in English that one should, and could, easily point out.

    "prepared in advance"

    "prepare in advance"
    Last edited by PROESL; 12-Aug-2009 at 02:12.

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