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    #1

    is x be x to be

    I have found the following sentence on a Physics book:

    a) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field is massless"
    I think it is not quite correct, in my opinion it would be better to say:
    b) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field be massless"
    Or even better:
    c) "gauge invariance requires the gauge field to be massless" (no that)

    1) Do you agree the "a" sentence above is grammatically incorrect?
    2) What about "b" and "c"?
    3) If "a" is incorrect, as I think it is, how should one explain it in grammar terms?
    I can only say that "a" sounds incorrect, but I do not know which grammar rules play a role here.

    Would you please help me analysing the grammar rules on the three sentences above?

    P.S.: Feel free to point our any possible mistakes on this post.

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    #2

    Re: is x be x to be

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I have found the following sentence on a Physics book:

    a) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field is massless"
    I think it is not quite correct, in my opinion it would be better to say:
    b) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field be massless"
    Or even better:
    c) "gauge invariance requires the gauge field to be massless" (no that)

    1) Do you agree the "a" sentence above is grammatically incorrect?
    2) What about "b" and "c"?
    3) If "a" is incorrect, as I think it is, how should one explain it in grammar terms?
    I can only say that "a" sounds incorrect, but I do not know which grammar rules play a role here.

    Would you please help me analysing the grammar rules on the three sentences above?

    P.S.: Feel free to point our any possible mistakes on this post.
    BrE speakers actually do accept 'require + indicative', although most AmE speakers would consider it incorrect, preferring your option (b).

    Option (c), however, acceptable to speakers of any variety of English, is arguably the best choice for this kind of construction.

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    #3

    Re: is x be x to be

    Quote Originally Posted by philo2009 View Post
    BrE speakers actually do accept 'require + indicative', although most AmE speakers would consider it incorrect, preferring your option (b).

    Option (c), however, acceptable to speakers of any variety of English, is arguably the best choice for this kind of construction.
    So it is the verb which rules here!
    Now I understand the first construction: 'require + indicative'
    Other examples could be:
    (a2) The teacher requires that you study more this topic.
    (a3) That condition requires that a unique answer exists.

    What about the (b) and (c) constructions? 'require + ?? ' what's the nomenclature? infinitive? bare infinitive?

    (b2) The teacher requires that you study more this topic.
    (b3) That condition requires that a unique answer exist.

    (c2) The teacher requires you to study more this topic.
    (c3) That condition requires a unique answer to exist.

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: is x be x to be

    All should read that you "study this topic more" rather than "study more this topic" which is a word order that doesn't work in modern English.

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    #5

    Re: is x be x to be

    Thank you very much for that remark on the word order konungursvia.
    That is one thing I was not aware of.

    Regarding the main point. I would like to confirm if both forms
    (a3) That condition requires that a unique answer exists.
    (b3) That condition requires that a unique answer exist. (without the final s)
    are indeed correct, in the sense that philo2009 stated, regarding the original sentences.

    I think (a3) is the construction 'require + indicative' philo2009 said, while (b3) is 'require + infinitive'. But I need someone's confirmation.

    Are there other verbs besides require which work the same way here?

    P.S.: Feel free to point out any possible mistakes on this post.

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: is x be x to be

    They want us to buy 3 more books!

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: is x be x to be

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    Thank you very much for that remark on the word order konungursvia.
    That is one thing I was not aware of.

    Regarding the main point. I would like to confirm if both forms
    (a3) That condition requires that a unique answer exists.
    (b3) That condition requires that a unique answer exist. (without the final s)
    are indeed correct, in the sense that philo2009 stated, regarding the original sentences.

    I think (a3) is the construction 'require + indicative' philo2009 said, while (b3) is 'require + infinitive'. But I need someone's confirmation.

    Are there other verbs besides require which work the same way here?

    P.S.: Feel free to point out any possible mistakes on this post.
    Yes, both are correct, the subjunctive "that an answer exist" more so, in educated company.

  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: is x be x to be

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    a) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field is massless"
    b) "gauge invariance requires that the gauge field be massless"
    c) "gauge invariance requires the gauge field to be massless" (no that)
    They are all acceptable!

    She is a professor who ...
    Ela uma professora que ...

    When?
    When the time is right!

    Quando?
    Quando for a hora certa!

    Interesting, huh?


  5. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: is x be x to be

    Good analogy, marcio, but we must remember that the rules for when to apply the subjunctive are much more elaborate in Portuguese than Spanish, and more elaborate in Spanish than in French, and more elaborate in French than in English.

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    #10

    Re: is x be x to be

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Good analogy, marcio, but we must remember that the rules for when to apply the subjunctive are much more elaborate in Portuguese than Spanish, and more elaborate in Spanish than in French, and more elaborate in French than in English.
    It is good to know that.

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