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    #1

    Going shopping

    In the sentence, "we're going shopping", which part of speech would you say "shopping" is?

    I would ask the same for sentences such as "they go bowling every Wednesday night", "they go jogging every other morning".

    With which part of speech can we identify "bowling" and "jogging".

    I've thought about this, but haven't been able to provide myself with what I think is a good answer.

    Does anyone know or have any ideas?

  1. julianna's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Going shopping

    i don't undersatnd exactly what do you mean by "which part of speach" ,can you give me an example please?


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    #3

    Re: Going shopping

    Quote Originally Posted by julianna View Post
    i don't undersatnd exactly what do you mean by "which part of speach" ,can you give me an example please?
    A part of speech is something such as an adverb, a noun, an adjective, or a verb.


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    #4

    Re: Going shopping

    Well I don't know the answer and I am anxioulsy waiting for the expert answers.
    But I would say may be it is related to the difference from gerund to present participle, which I have not yet understood quite well?

  2. julianna's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Going shopping

    maybe maybe ,i think that they are adverbs...


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    #6

    Re: Going shopping

    Quote Originally Posted by julianna View Post
    maybe maybe ,i think that they are adverbs...
    I've thought the same, but there is something about it that I still find questionable. So that's why I posted this question.

    I've also had similar considersations to that of Ymnisky's.


  3. julianna's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: Going shopping

    i will look for the perfect answers , and of course i am waiting for the good answer from another persons.

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    #8

    Re: Going shopping

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    But I would say may be it is related to the difference from gerund to present participle, which I have not yet understood quite well?
    I think this is right, and this is what makes it a little complicated. I think the story goes roughly like this, though I am not an expert and may need correcting.

    The first problem is that English gerunds and participles are both "hybrid" parts of speech, so things involving them are not usually very neat and tidy. The second is that constructions like this are in a process of historical development, which is still probably continuing.

    With that said, the origin of the construction was probably a prepositional phrase like "go at/on/for fishing". Clearly this was a Verb + Preposition + Gerund construction, with the PP denoting purpose, and therefore as Julianna says, adverbial. This became, in rather quaint archaic English, "going a-fishing", where I would describe the "a" as some kind of grammatical marker continuing to give the gerund adverbial force. Then the "a" dropped out, giving what exactly?

    Probably not a bare gerund, because that would be an NP and I can't see what grammatical function an NP can have there. I think the answer must be a present participle, since the same process (preposition + gerund becoming preseent participle) is behind the development of the English continuous tenses:

    I am at/on hunting --> I am a-hunting --> I am hunting

    The difference is that the latter has become part of the basic paradigm of the verb "hunt", giving it a set of continuous tenses in which "to be" has become an auxiliary verb. This is a process called "grammaticalization". The "go hunting" construction has not been grammaticalized to this extent (the "go" is not quite an auxiliary), so I would analyze it as verb + present participle.

    Sorry if this is a bit long and convoluted, but I hope it helps. I look forward to any other ideas.


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    #9

    Re: Going shopping

    I found your post on this topic to be helpful. Yet I can't help thinking that "ing" forms in this particular construction are adverbs or adverbial, though I'm even in doubt about that, which is why I posted this question. I should read your post again to see if I change my mind. Nonetheless, noting that a structure such as this is undergoing "grammaticalization" is an interesting idea.

    And as for using "a" before "hunting", I'm reminded of the old children's melody "A hunting we will go", which can be rephrased as "We will go a hunting".

    "a hunting we will go" - Google Search

    A Hunting We Will Go song lyrics from Kididdles.
    Last edited by PROESL; 13-Aug-2009 at 19:23.

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    #10

    Re: Going shopping

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I found your post on this topic to be helpful. Yet I can't help thinking that "ing" forms in this particular construction are adverbs or adverbial, though I'm even doubt about that, which is why I posted this question.
    I also don't think they have lost the original adverbial force of the construction (probably purposive, as I suggested). Participles can often function adverbially, I think. This is part of their "hybrid" nature.

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