Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Hello.

    Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Could you proofread the sentence above?
    Can I say: I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than me?

    Thank you.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jan 2008
    • Posts: 2,944
    #2

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    How about:

    From what he says, he probably has five times as much money as I do.


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #3

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than me.

    Is this not good?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #4

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than me.

    Is this not good?
    Some people will claim that "as" functions as a conjunction in a sentence like this, and therefore it is not correct to use "me". However, in everyday conversation we can often hear people using "as" as a preposition, in which case "as" is followed by an object pronoun. If you want to ensure that your style sounds more formal, then don't treat "as" as a preposition. As well, when you hear someone say "... five times more money than me", I would not be critical and think that they are speaking incorrectly.

    Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan

    Page 111 number 136.4

    4 pronouns after as

    In an informal style we can use object pronouns (me, him etc) after as.

    She doesn't sing as well as me.

    In a formal style we prefer subject + verb after as.

    She doesn't sing as well as I do.

    A subject without a verb (e.g. as well as he) is unusual in this structure in modern English.
    ________________________________________________

    And so right he is. I especialy agree with the last point he makes here. It sounds, at least, a little unusual.

    We often use an informal style. It's important to understand these things in a practical context, especially if you go to an English-speaking country. You wouldn't want to attempt to conform to "standards" that most native speakers are entirely unaware of. What's worse is studying a "rule" and then observing that many native speakers simply don't follow this rule.
    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Aug-2009 at 07:50. Reason: left out an important word "not" typing too fast again


    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #5

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than I do.

    I can guess from what he said that he has five times as much momey as I do.


    Are these two good?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #6

    Smile Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than I do.

    I can guess from what he said that he has five times as much momey as I do.

    Are these two good?
    Yes, they're good.

    There's just one thing: "money" not "momey".



    • Join Date: Jul 2006
    • Posts: 2,886
    #7

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post

    There's just one thing: "money" not "momey".

    or mummy
    Oh, sorry, mummy is a C

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Apr 2007
    • Posts: 4,146
    #8

    Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    I can guess from what he said that he has five times more momey than I do.

    I can guess from what he said that he has five times as much momey as I do.

    Are these two good?
    I would not use "five times more" because it is confusing; it logically does not mean the same as "five times as much". (just as 'fifty percent more' doesn't mean 'fifty percent as much')

    "five times as much" is very clear.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #9

    Smile Re: Judging from what he says, probably he has five times as much money as I do.

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    I would not use "five times more" because it is confusing; it logically does not mean the same as "five times as much". (just as 'fifty percent more' doesn't mean 'fifty percent as much')

    "five times as much" is very clear.
    If I may kindly add something here, I'd appreciate it. I feel that they have the same meaning and are both idiomatic English expressions - idiomatic in the sense that people use both phrases and understand that both mean the same thing. I think it would take more effort to misunderstand "times more than" than it would to understand it as people generally mean it.

    I've done a little research on the Internet, and I came across this passage from Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage, which is provided by Google Books.

    You'll have to find the little plus sign and click it in order to make the print large enough to view.

    There are a lot of examples of this form posted on the Internet as well: times more than.

    Also, there is something about this in Practical English Usage by Michael Swan. Here it is:

    Page 118 Section 141.3

    Instead of three/four etc. times as much, we can use three/four etc times + comparative.

    She can walk three times faster than you.
    It was ten times more difficult than I expected.
    _________________________________________

    Merriam-Webster's Dictionary of English Usage

    He has five times more than you

    Merriam-Webster's dictionary of English usage - Google Books Result
    by Merriam-Webster, Inc - 1994 - Reference - 989 pages
    is ambiguous, so that "He has five times more money than you" can be misunderstood as meaning "He has six times as much money as you." It is. in fact, ...
    books.google.com/books?isbn=0877791325...






    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Aug-2009 at 06:53. Reason: additional information

Similar Threads

  1. [Essay] For Money or Love
    By Unregistered in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 17-Jun-2009, 17:34
  2. Can someone please proofread my persuassive essay
    By ricky2520 in forum Editing & Writing Topics
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 21-Sep-2008, 13:50
  3. [Grammar] 3 times bigger than=3 times as big as or 4 times as big as
    By Matthewxua in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 19-Sep-2008, 09:38
  4. soft money
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 22-Apr-2008, 06:36

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •