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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    The new job is not a promotion as such, but ...

    Hello.

    as such as the word is usually understood; in the exact sense of the word: The new job is not a promotion as such, but it has good prospects. ‘Well, did they offer it to you?’ ‘No, not as such, but they said I had a good chance.’

    "The new job is not a promotion as such, but..."
    Can I say The new job is actually not a promotion, but... instead?

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #2

    Smile Re: The new job is not a promotion as such, but ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    as such as the word is usually understood; in the exact sense of the word: The new job is not a promotion as such, but it has good prospects. ‘Well, did they offer it to you?’ ‘No, not as such, but they said I had a good chance.’

    "The new job is not a promotion as such, but..."
    Can I say The new job is actually not a promotion, but... instead?

    Thank you.
    Yes, you can say it that way.

    Using "as such" makes the statement sound more formal.

    It might be more usual word order to say "is not actually" instead of "is actually not", but both ways are correct.



    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #3

    Re: The new job is not a promotion as such, but ...

    Thanks a lot, PROESL.

    Do you normally use "not something as such, but ... " in writing?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #4

    Re: The new job is not a promotion as such, but ...

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Thanks a lot, PROESL.

    Do you normally use "not something as such, but ... " in writing?
    Yes, we use this in writing.

    Anything in spoken language could possibly be used in writing. It's just that writing is often viewed as conforming more to standards and conventions of more formal language. This really depends on the kind of writing, however. More writing is informal than some people would like to imagine, but informal writing, generally, should conform to standards and conventions. I know because I correct business emails in real life, not just online virtual life. Business writing does not necessarily mean formal writing. It does, however, mean correct writing and professional writing. There is a lot of writing for which one must reserve a more formal style, but this idea should be balanced with an understanding for what is practical in each situation - or circumstance. I'm about to start correcting writing for a person who is writing a periodic review for an employee. Now, as well as correct grammar, that requires a more formal style, though not overly formal.

    There are no restrictions on particular phrases or sentences that one can use in writing. It's a matter of what makes sense and what is appropriate. Many zealous language critics offer advice within the boundaries of that which is only formal. This is not practical, and it has the tendency to mildly rankle my nerves when I happen to encounter it.


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