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    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #1

    "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Hello.

    They took it for granted that I would go to the party.

    Do you use "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..." interchangeably?

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #2

    Smile Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    They took it for granted that I would go to the party.

    Do you use "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..." interchangeably?

    Thank you.
    No, they're not generally interchangeable, though one might find or provide a context in which both expressions could be used interchangeably. The meanings of both expressions are different as well.

    We use "take it for granted" when we don't really have a conscious appreciation of something that we always expect to have or be able to use. Most people take it for granted that they have water every day. Some people are more appreciative of water and other basic necessities that many of us take for granted.

    I'm not sure about "take it as read that" as a particular expression. To me, it's a phrase, but I can't say I recognize it as a kind of idiomatic expression in the same way that "take something for granted" is an idiomatic expression. I would say "take it as read that" means "take it as understood in general", but it depends on how it would or could be used in context.

    By the way, it's important to understand other ways in which "grant" can be used.

    Granted that ... - understood (in a certain way) -used to set up what someone is about to say

    A grant from the government or a private organization for some sort of research, charity work, or artistic endeavor.

    I'll grant you this ... I'll give you credit for this

    I'll grant you this much ...

    I'd look these up in Google or go to the HyperDictionary to check out "grant" and "granted". I have to warn you, though, that the HyperDictionary is too much. It can give one a headache.


    Definition of GRANT (Meaning of GRANT), a 5 Letter Word

    I would just read the part that is the definition. The rest could give you a headache.



    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #3

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Thank you, PROESL.

    It's correct to say "He took his wife for granted," but it's incorrect to say "He took his wife as read," isn't it?

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    #4

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Thank you, PROESL.

    It's correct to say "He took his wife for granted," but it's incorrect to say "He took his wife as read," isn't it?
    "Take it as read" is a BrE expression meaning assume. To take for granted is used in all regions to mean a failure of appreciation, or occasionally, in its original meaning, to take as given.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #5

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Thank you, PROESL.

    It's correct to say "He took his wife for granted," but it's incorrect to say "He took his wife as read," isn't it?
    Yes, the first sentence is correct.

    However, as konungursvia has informed us, "take something as read" is a British expression, and one with which I'm not familiar. So I would ask konungursvia or a British English speaker about the second sentence.
    Last edited by PROESL; 18-Aug-2009 at 04:42.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #6

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Japanese people take it for granted that they don't wear shoes at home.
    This sounds odd, doesn't it?

    Normally Japanese people don't wear shoes at home.
    This sounds good, doesn't it?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #7

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Japanese people take it for granted that they don't wear shoes at home.
    This sounds odd, doesn't it?

    Normally Japanese people don't wear shoes at home.
    This sounds good, doesn't it?
    The first one is just a little odd or strange only because we typically apply the expression "take something for granted" to things that we really need, want, or care about. Not wearing shoes at home is a custom. However, I suppose that if something happened to prevent Japanese people from not wearing shoes at home, then I guess you could say that "they took this custom for granted", or more accurately the right to have this custom. Do you see what I mean?

    I don't think Japanese people will ever lose the right to take off their shoes at home, so maybe the expression is a bit odd. However, if they did one day lose the right to have this custom because of some unforeseen event or circumstance, then that would be another story.


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #8

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    PROESL:
    Could you say it in another way, please?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #9

    Re: "take it for granted that..." and "take it as read that..."

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    PROESL:
    Could you say it in another way, please?
    Japanese people don't even think about not wearing shoes at home. It's something they never do.

    Another way:

    Japanese people don't even think about taking off their shoes at home. It's just something they do.

    How's that? Is that what you're looking for?

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