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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #1

    difference

    Please, what is the difference between:

    Don't talk to her.
    Don't talk with her.


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    #2

    Smile Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by 100 View Post
    Please, what is the difference between:

    Don't talk to her.
    Don't talk with her.
    They're the same.

    talk to her - She hears and listens to your words, and you hear and listen to her words. Your talking is directed to her.

    talk with her - You accompany her in conversation. Two people talk together.



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    #3

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    They're the same.

    talk to her - She hears and listens to your words, and you hear and listen to her words. Your talking is directed to her.

    talk with her - You accompany her in conversation. Two people talk together.

    Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please


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    #4

    Smile Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by 100 View Post
    Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please
    The difference in meaning has to do with the prepositions. For practical purposes, I can't say I would be able to really describe the difference between the two.

    Maybe another poster can say something here.


  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by 100 View Post
    Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please
    There is, perhaps, a subtle difference; one could say that "talk to her" suggests something one sided, and "talk with her" suggests a shared conversation. "Talk with her" could also be seen as more polite. Does that fit with your question?


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    #6

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    There is, perhaps, a subtle difference; one could say that "talk to her" suggests something one sided, and "talk with her" suggests a shared conversation. "Talk with her" could also be seen as more polite. Does that fit with your question?
    Yes.
    Many thanks.
    I get it


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    #7

    Re: difference

    Some people, in order to express some minor form of annoyance or mild frustration, will say "I'm talking to the wall" or "Am I talking to the wall?" - or even "I think I'm talking to the wall".

    How does this sound?

    "I'm talking with the wall."
    "Am I talking with the wall?"
    "I think I'm talking with the wall?"

    They do, sometimes, say that the walls have ears. So be careful about talking to the wall or talking with the wall.

    To much talking to the wall will drive you up a wall. If I hadn't talked to the wall so much, I wouldn't have been driven up it.

    Stop it! Stop it now!
    How about a thank-you for this? I think it's really good.
    Last edited by PROESL; 19-Aug-2009 at 04:20.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by 100 View Post
    Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please
    I think this is a common mistake.
    There are many phrases in English that can take two or more forms. If you ask for a difference here, you will certainly get one.
    I'm not disputing the answers given. But "talk to" can be used in all cases if your current problem is to choose which form to use.

  3. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: difference

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    I think this is a common mistake.
    There are many phrases in English that can take two or more forms. If you ask for a difference here, you will certainly get one.
    I'm not disputing the answers given. But "talk to" can be used in all cases if your current problem is to choose which form to use.
    Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please [quote]

    I agree Ray, but the OP insisted that he needed a response to answer a question, that's why I said "...there is, perhaps, a subtle difference..."

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: difference

    [QUOTE=bhaisahab;504529]Many thanks for you
    but I should choose one of them in a question so there must be a difference.
    Please

    I agree Ray, but the OP insisted that he needed a response to answer a question, that's why I said "...there is, perhaps, a subtle difference..."
    Yes, and I said that was a valid answer. I'm not criticising those who responded to the "what is the difference?" question by giving the OP a difference - I do it myself. I seems to be the obvious thing to do.
    I also know that, when a poster asks "Is there a difference between A and B", a replier is often damned if they find a difference, and damned is they don't. But I'm not damning anyone.

    I was responding to the follow up question in which the OP was expressing a different problem: "What should I use?", and making an incorrect inference that if two forms exist, there must be a semantic difference between them.

    I'm sure you'd agree that many learners do not take as much trouble choosing the words in their question as we sometimes do in reading and interpreting them.

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