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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Talking Pls Check these Sentences

    Hi,

    1) What time will you take break?

    2) At what time will you take break?

    To me the first sentence sounds incorrect.
    Am I right? If so, what is the grammatical logic behind it?

    Thanks a bundle

  2. julianna's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    yes , you're all right, the first one is wrong, it should be 'at what time will you take break?' but i don't have any grammatical explanation, wait for an answer from a teatcher!!!


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    #3

    Smile Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    1) What time will you take break?

    2) At what time will you take break?

    To me the first sentence sounds incorrect.
    Am I right? If so, what is the grammatical logic behind it?

    Thanks a bundle
    I would use the progressive form or "be going to" because the time that one takes a break is oftentimes already decided or arranged, and I think that a questioner could assume as much even if it turns out that one has not decided and it is not arranged.

    What time are you taking break?
    What time are you going to take your break?
    When are you going on break?

    I'm going on break at 11:00.
    I'm taking my break at 11:00.
    I don't think I'll be taking a break this morning. I'm too busy.

    I think I'll probably take my break at about 11:00. - Use will for something that is not planned or not certain.


    A context in which "will" could be used:

    So what time do you think you'll take your break today? - Someone would ask this question using "will" if one understands, and is therefore able to presume, that a someone is, generally, not in the habit of taking a break at the same time every day.

    These are not structural rules. They are logical guidelines to follow in the context of how native speakers of English approach using true or pure modal auxiliaries and semi-modal auxiliaries. In a sense, such guidelines could be "rules", but not in a structural way, which is oftentimes the view taken when it comes to English grammar. As well, you'll find the same guidelines outlined in ESL grammar books and other types of coursebooks or method books for ESL-EFL.


  3. anupumh's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    So what you want to comment out here is that both the statements are incorrect, is it so?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    1) What time will you take break?

    2) At what time will you take break?

    To me the first sentence sounds incorrect.
    Am I right? If so, what is the grammatical logic behind it?

    Thanks a bundle
    Whether you use 'will' or 'going to' (and in this situation it's largely academic), it is better to use 'at what time...' rather than 'what time...' It is better English, it's more polite and less abrupt. Americans may not agree however.


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    #6

    Smile Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    So what you want to comment out here is that both the statements are incorrect, is it so?
    They're correct in a structural way, but it's not likely, in my opinion, that a speaker would use "will" to ask this question, except for in the type of context that I highlighted in my last post.

    Calling someone on Friday night, one typically says, "What are doing tonight?" Not, "What will you do tonight?"

    When we ask such a question, we would mostly assume that there is a plan or that someone likely has a plan. If not, then the listener replies accordingly, using "will" or another modal such as "could, may, or might".

    Last edited by PROESL; 18-Aug-2009 at 20:05.


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    #7

    Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    Whether you use 'will' or 'going to' (and in this situation it's largely academic), it is better to use 'at what time...' rather than 'what time...' It is better English, it's more polite and less abrupt. Americans may not agree however.
    Both are fine for me. I could use one or the other, depending on what, though, I don't know. Beginning with a preposition as in, "at what time", is less likely among AmE speakers. To that extent, AmE would differ in this area.


  5. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: Pls Check these Sentences

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    They're correct in a structural way, but it's not likely, in my opinion, that a speaker would use "will" to ask this question, except for in the type of context that I highlighted in my last post.

    Calling someone on Friday night, one typically says, "What are doing tonight?" Not, "What will you do tonight?"

    When we ask such a question, we would mostly assume that there is a plan or that someon likely has a plan. If not, then the listener replies accordingly, using "will" or another modal such as "could, may, or might".

    Yes, if you are asking someone what they have planned to do for an evening etc. use 'going to', in my opinion 'taking a break' is very different. There are so many situations in which one might 'take a break' unplanned.

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