Results 1 to 9 of 9

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #1

    Due to

    Hi,

    I want to know how to use " due to" phrase?
    To my knowledge, "due to" phrase prefer to add a subject .
    But how about "due to + sentence (Subject+verb+)"

    Ex.) ...due to that they wants my skills so that they promote ...

    Thanks,

    Ken

  1. RonBee's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Feb 2003
    • Posts: 16,551
    #2

    Re: Due to

    due to = because of

    Due to his losing his job, he has less income.




    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Smile Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by RonBee View Post
    due to = because of

    Due to his losing his job, he has less income.


    For a little variety, we could say "due to the fact that ...".



    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #4

    Re: Due to

    Hi,

    So, due to= because of,
    But it is possible to use " due to the fact that....", if I want to put a sentence.
    Am I correct?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #5

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by furufuruusa View Post
    Hi,

    So, due to= because of,
    But it is possible to use " due to the fact that....", if I want to put a sentence.
    Am I correct?
    Yes, this is correct.

    Due to the fact that he lost his job, he had to give up his membership at the country club.

    Due to the fact that - followed by a clause -subject and a verb - "the fact that" - This introduces a noun clause and tends to be used in more formal language.

    Due to - preposition - takes an object, a noun or a verbal noun ing form

    Similarly, there's also "despite" and "despite the fact that".

    As well there is, "in spite of" and "in spite of the fact that".

    These expressions can sometimes lend a more "serious" tone, perhaps, to one's language. They're not the sort of thing one hears frequently in very ordinary and everyday types of conversation. We do use them, nevertheless. I just don't feel that they rank very high on the frequency scale.
    Last edited by PROESL; 20-Aug-2009 at 02:44. Reason: detailed info correction


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #6

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by furufuruusa View Post
    Hi,

    So, due to= because of,
    But it is possible to use " due to the fact that....", if I want to put a sentence.
    Am I correct?
    I forgot about the other part of your question.

    The game was canceled due to the rain.
    The game was canceled because of the rain.

    "Due to" sounds more formal. "Because of" is more usual and typical. One might expect to hear "due to" as part of an announcment.

    Sometimes people use "owing to" as well. It's the same as "due to", but it is not used as often. In fact, I think it's used rather infrequently.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 5
    #7

    Re: Due to

    Thank you very much.

    It makes me clear.

    Ken

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Switzerland

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,676
    #8

    Re: Due to

    I'm not a teacher, but I know that many grammarians frown upon the use of "due to" to mean "because of." "Due to" should be used to mean "caused by" or "resulting from"; that's what I was taught.

    See also due to the fact that.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #9

    Re: Due to

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I'm not a teacher, but I know that many grammarians frown upon the use of "due to" to mean "because of." "Due to" should be used to mean "caused by" or "resulting from"; that's what I was taught.

    See also due to the fact that.
    I've heard, or read, this as well. Though frowned upon by grammarians, we may observe that reality paints a different picture of "due to".

    due to: Information from Answers.com

    2. Attributable to, because of, as in Due to scanty rainfall, we may face a crop failure. This usage has been criticized by some authorities, but today it is widely considered standard. [Early 1900s] Also see on account of.

    Michael Swan simply tells about the phrase "due to" in Practical English Usage. A well-known authority himself, Michael Swan gives no deference to other authorities, whoever they are. In addition to his definition and description of "due to", here's what he says regarding this the usage of "due to".

    Practical English Usage, by Michael Swan - Page 151 section 166

    We had to postpone the meeting due to the strike.
    Due to the bad weather, the match was canceled.

    Some people believe it is incorrect to use due to at the beginning of a clause in this way, but the structure is common in educated usage.

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •