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    #1

    Post Large and small difference

    Dear All,
    I have completed the following three sentences with the words, can you check it , please?
    Slightly much lot

    1. Surprisingly, the trip is only slightly more expensive if you travel first class.
    2. Since they moved house, Mark and Carla have been much happier.
    3. Marianne is a lot more relaxed since her holiday.
    Thanking you

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: Large and small difference

    Quote Originally Posted by ofd View Post
    Dear All,
    I have completed the following three sentences with the words, can you check it , please?
    Slightly much lot

    1. Surprisingly, the trip is only slightly more expensive if you travel by first class.
    2. Since they moved to the house, Mark and Carla have been feeling much happier.
    3. Marianne is a lot more relaxed since her holiday.
    Thanking you
    With some minor correction, sentences are OK.

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    #3

    Re: Large and small difference

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    With some minor correction, sentences are OK.

    I don't agree that your addition of 'by' in 1., 'to the' in 2. or 'a lot' in 3. are necessary, usual or indeed add anything. And in the case of 3 they add something which is unknown.

    Re 1. I don't think I've ever heard this in normal conversation or speech. One travels by train or by car, but not by first. By is redundant.

    Re 2. When the subject is the process of going to live somewhere else it's usual to talk of moving house not moving to a house. The latter is implied by the former.

    Re 3. Why do you assume that the speaker means to say Marianne is a 'lot' more relaxed? It's perfectly acceptable to say just 'more relaxed' and unless you know more about Marianne than the speaker you are assuming something about which you are not capable.

    Regards

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: Large and small difference

    Quote Originally Posted by Richard1 View Post
    I don't agree that your addition of 'by' in 1., 'to the' in 2. or 'a lot' in 3. are necessary, usual or indeed add anything. And in the case of 3 they add something which is unknown.

    Re 1. I don't think I've ever heard this in normal conversation or speech. One travels by train or by car, but not by first. By is redundant. I agree, it was only used to add meaning.

    Re 2. When the subject is the process of going to live somewhere else it's usual to talk of moving house not moving to a house. The latter is implied by the former. I can not agree. 'Move' is an intranstive verb meaning: to go to a different place to live or work. It can not take a direct object. So yuo need a preposition to join any noun with it.The following setences have been taken from cambridge dictionary.
    They've bought a new house, but it will need a lot of work before they can move into it/move in. (Cambridge American Dictionay.
    When we retired, we moved to Arizona. I hope we can move to a larger house.( Cambridge International Dictionary)

    Re 3. Why do you assume that the speaker means to say Marianne is a 'lot' more relaxed? It's perfectly acceptable to say just 'more relaxed' and unless you know more about Marianne than the speaker you are assuming something about which you are not capable. You can't say that a lot more relaxed is incorrect. I feel a lot more better is a common answer to some one who asks How do you feel now?.

    Regards
    SKP
    Last edited by sarat_106; 20-Aug-2009 at 15:32.

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Large and small difference

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    SKP
    Have a look here:
    Cambridge Dictionaries Online - Cambridge University Press

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    #6

    Re: Large and small difference

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    SKP

    Originally Posted by Richard1
    I don't agree that your addition of 'by' in 1., 'to the' in 2. or 'a lot' in 3. are necessary, usual or indeed add anything. And in the case of 3 they add something which is unknown.

    Re 2. When the subject is the process of going to live somewhere else it's usual to talk of moving house not moving to a house. The latter is implied by the former. I can not agree. 'Move' is an intranstive verb meaning: to go to a different place to live or work. It can not take a direct object. So yuo need a preposition to join any noun with it.The following setences have been taken from cambridge dictionary.
    They've bought a new house, but it will need a lot of work before they can move into it/move in. (Cambridge American Dictionay.
    When we retired, we moved to Arizona. I hope we can move to a larger house.( Cambridge International Dictionary)
    The sentences you quote are perfectly correct but irrelevant.
    I speak as a native born English speaker and no one ever says, (when talking about upping sticks and going to live somewhere else), 'we're moving to a house', it's always, 'we're moving house'. Which may seem illogical, or even daft, particularly when for instance they may be moving to a bungalow or flat, but when has English ever been straightforward!

    Re 3. Why do you assume that the speaker means to say Marianne is a 'lot' more relaxed? It's perfectly acceptable to say just 'more relaxed' and unless you know more about Marianne than the speaker you are assuming something about which you are not capable. You can't say that a lot more relaxed is incorrect. I feel a lot more better is a common answer to some one who asks How do you feel now?.
    I've never ever heard anyone reply 'I feel a lot more better', to the question you pose.

    Regards

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