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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    to bring off

    Dear teachers and friends...

    to bring off:

    Meaning: To succeed in doing something considered to be very difficult.
    I don't know how, but he managed to bring off the Acme Foods deal.


    My question is, is this phrasal verb chiefly British?

    Thanks


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    #2

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Dear teachers and friends...

    to bring off:

    Meaning: To succeed in doing something considered to be very difficult.
    I don't know how, but he managed to bring off the Acme Foods deal.

    My question is, is this phrasal verb chiefly British?

    Thanks
    It could be that it is chiefly British because I'm accustomed to the phrase "pull off".

    I don't know how, but he managed to pull off the Acme Foods deal.

    Pull-off: Information from Answers.com

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    It could be that it is chiefly British because I'm accustomed to the phrase "pull off".

    I don't know how, but he managed to pull off the Acme Foods deal.

    Pull-off: Information from Answers.com
    Hmm...Interesting.

    I was a talking to a friend of mine, from Missouri. I pronounced 'bring off', he had trouble gettinh the meaning.

    PS. Proesl, I'd bet they are not accostumated to use 'to accostumate' where you live.

    Thank you, man.


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    #4

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Hmm...Interesting.

    I was a talking to a friend of mine, from Missouri. I pronounced 'bring off', he had trouble gettinh the meaning.

    PS. Proesl, I'd bet they are not accostumated to use 'to accostumate' where you live.

    Thank you, man.
    You're welcome.

    I know what you mean, though I've never heard "accostumate". I have, however, heard "pronunciate" and "conversate" spoken by native speakers of English.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    You're welcome.

    I know what you mean, though I've never heard "accostumate". I have, however, heard "pronunciate" and "conversate" spoken by native speakers of English.
    Hahaha...

    and these adjectives?

    fluvial, nascent, clandestine, and exuberant.

    Thank you.

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Hahaha...

    and these adjectives?

    fluvial, nascent, clandestine, and exuberant.

    Thank you.
    What do you find wrong with these adjectives?

  5. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    What do you find wrong with these adjectives?
    There's nothing wrong with them. I am just asking how often they are used.

  6. Offroad's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: to bring off

    Dear Bhai,

    I would like to know if 'bring off' is widely used in Britain...

    Thank you.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    There's nothing wrong with them. I am just asking how often they are used.
    It's difficult to say how often they are used, but they are certainly used, in their appropriate contexts.

  8. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: to bring off

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Dear Bhai,

    I would like to know if 'bring off' is widely used in Britain...

    Thank you.
    Yes, I would say it's widely used.

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