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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Arrow Near and Nearby and Near to

    Hi,

    Whats the difference between near and nearby and near to and pls explain their respective usage.

    He lives near my house.
    He lives nearby my house.
    He lives near to my house.

    Which one is more appropriate and why?

    Thanks


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    #2

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Whats the difference between near and nearby and near to and pls explain their respective usage.

    He lives near my house.
    He lives nearby my house.
    He lives near to my house.

    Which one is more appropriate and why?

    Thanks
    He lives near my house.
    He lives nearby my house.

    He lives near to my house.

    We don't use "near to" in the US. I've heard students use it, however. I'm not sure, but it might be something that is used in BrE.

    Other than the fact that it's not part of US English, I would say it's not correct because "near" is a preposition and "to" is a preposition. Normally, a preposition is not followed by another preposition.

    We say "close to" - close to my house. That's only one preposition, and the prepositional phrase is adverbial - location. "Close" is an adjective.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    He lives near my house.
    He lives nearby my house.

    He lives near to my house.

    We don't use "near to" in the US. I've heard students use it, however. I'm not sure, but it might be something that is used in BrE.

    Other than the fact that it's not part of US English, I would say it's not correct because "near" is a preposition and "to" is a preposition. Normally, a preposition is not followed by another preposition.

    We say "close to" - close to my house. That's only one preposition, and the prepositional phrase is adverbial - location. "Close" is an adjective.
    Are both near my house and nearby my house mean the same or they have different implied meaning?


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    #4

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Are both near my house and nearby my house mean the same or they have different implied meaning?
    They mean the same thing. I can't imagine what difference it would really make to use one or the other. It's more common to simply use "near", however.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Interesting...I guess there's a difference between them.

    There's a bar near my place. (sounds like 'near' is an adverb)
    There's a bar nearby. (sounds like 'near' is an adjective)

    Not sure if we could say: There's a bar near by my place. Althrough I can't see anything wrong with them.

    Not sure.

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    We don't use "near to" in the US. I've heard students use it, however. I'm not sure, but it might be something that is used in BrE.

    Other than the fact that it's not part of US English, I would say it's not correct because "near" is a preposition and "to" is a preposition. Normally, a preposition is not followed by another preposition.
    Hmm...Both corpora of English give us many entries for 'near to':
    COCA (AmE): 584
    BNC (BrE): 45
    Last edited by Offroad; 22-Aug-2009 at 03:48.


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    #6

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Interesting...I guess there's a difference between them.

    There's a bar near my place. (sounds like 'near' is an adverb)
    There's a bar nearby. (sounds like 'near' is an adjective)

    Not sure if we could say: There's a bar near by my place. Althrough I can't see anything wrong with them.

    Not sure.


    Hmm...Both corpora of English give us many entries for 'near to':
    COCA (AmE): 584
    BNC (BrE): 45
    Who knows how to account for that? I don't use "near to", I've never heard an American use "near to", and it just doesn't sound normal to me.




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    #7

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Interesting...I guess there's a difference between them.

    There's a bar near my place. (sounds like 'near' is an adverb)
    There's a bar nearby. (sounds like 'near' is an adjective)

    Not sure if we could say: There's a bar near by my place. Althrough I can't see anything wrong with them.
    There's a bar near my place. - In this sentence "near" is a preposition. It's possible for "near" to be an adverb, but in this sentence it likes being a preposition. We can take a look at the phrase "near my place", and now where talkin' adverbial city all the way. I would call that an adverbial prepositional phrase - location.

    There's a bar nearby. - In this sentence "nearby" is an adjective. How do we know? Let's rephrase the sentence: A bar is nearby. There ya have it folks. Nearby is indeed an adjective.

    Not sure if we could say: There's a bar near by my place. Althrough I can't see anything wrong with them. <<

    Yes, you could say it that way, but then "near" becomes an adjective and "by" is a preposition. Now, in spoken English, I don't rightly believe that there's a soul on this planet that will be able to tell whether you're sayin' "nearby my place" or "near, by my place". So here's my suggestion: (are ya ready?) Here it is: Let's just keep "near" and "by" together and call it a good ole plain ole preposition. That word just likes bein' a preposition. Let me tell you. Yes, indeed, good ole "nearby" loves bein' a preposition. Or maybe it just likes to be one word? Yes, I do reckon that's it.

    I live nearby. - Where? Nearby - adverb - location.

    The bar is nearby. So it's a nearby bar? Yes, but let's just say the bar is nearby and nearby is an adjective.

    I live nearby the bar. - Now we're back to our good ole prepositional phrase doin' its adverbial work. Well, someone's got to do it. Don't you think? I do think so. Yes, I do.

    The bar is located nearby my place.
    The bar is located nearby the train station.




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    #8

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    The bar is nearby. So it's a nearby bar? Yes, but let's just say the bar is nearby and nearby is an adjective.
    A predicate adjective? Yes, it's a predicate adjective.

  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    so, you are saying that there's a difference between 'near' and 'nearby'?

    what if I say:

    - Hey, Steve, I live near...
    - Near to what?
    - Near (to) one of your houses.


    However... If I say 'I live nearby', you shall of course understand right away. No need to ask 'near to what'.

    Right?

    Thank you.


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    #10

    Re: Near and Nearby and Near to

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    so, you are saying that there's a difference between 'near' and 'nearby'?

    what if I say:

    - Hey, Steve, I live near...
    - Near to what?
    - Near (to) one of your houses.

    However... If I say 'I live nearby', you shall of course understand right away. No need to ask 'near to what'.

    Right?

    Thank you.
    No, I still would not use "near to" in your example dialog. I would just say "Near what?".

    Yes, with "nearby" the listener probably knows what the speaker means by "nearby". If not, then they need someone to troubleshoot their conversation.

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