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  1. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #1

    Question Jargon or Register?

    Hi everybody,

    I was wondering if you could tell me the difference between these two linguistic terms, Register and Jargon...So many thanks in advance...


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    #2

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Hi everybody,

    I was wondering if you could tell me the difference between these two linguistic terms, Register and Jargon...So many thanks in advance...

    Jargon is language that is specific to a particular profession or a particular group of people who share a common interest. Oftentimes, though not always, only people from these professions or groups know the meaning of their own jargon. Jargon can be informal or formal, depending on the profession or the group.

    Register has to to with the style of one's language: formal as opposed to informal, serious as opposed to easygoing, friendly and familiar as opposed to more respectful and distant.

    A register can also reflect the specific style of language one uses. For example, one could speak or write in a business register, a scientific register, a legal-law register, or an academic register.

  2. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Jargon is language that is specific to a particular profession or a particular group of people who share a common interest. Oftentimes, though not always, only people from these professions or groups know the meaning of their own jargon. Jargon can be informal or formal, depending on the profession or the group.

    Register has to to with the style of one's language: formal as opposed to informal, serious as opposed to easygoing, friendly and familiar as opposed to more respectful and distant.

    A register can also reflect the specific style of language one uses. For example, one could speak or write in a business register, a scientific register, a legal-law register, or an academic register.
    Thank you dear PROESL,
    I hope you wouldn't mind answering this too...Though I'm not sure, I think once I read there are times we are in a special situation/place where a related language is spoken and ,impressed by which or willing to cope with the other language users, we use the same language. Have we got any term for such usage of language? (when we use/have to use/had better use the terminology/style of the language used in that place) (say, a church) Sorry for writing in such a messy way...Thanks again...


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    #4

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thank you dear PROESL,
    I hope you wouldn't mind answering this too...Though I'm not sure, I think once I read there are times we are in a special situation/place where a related language is spoken and ,impressed by which or willing to cope with the other language users, we use the same language. Have we got any term for such usage of language? (when we use/have to use/had better use the terminology/style of the language used in that place) (say, a church) Sorry for writing in such a messy way...Thanks again...
    I would call this "peer pressure" or maybe "linguistic peer pressure", meaning people can make one feel obliged to fit into one's social surroundings by conforming to the "linguistic environment". This reminds me of a term called "code-switching". Sometimes people switch from one style of speaking to another style of speaking in order to adjust to the situation and, in effect, use language that they feel more comfortable with in a particular situation.

    Code-switching - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Code-Switching - English (ESL) Weblog

  3. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I would call this "peer pressure" or maybe "linguistic peer pressure", meaning people can make one feel obliged to fit into one's social surroundings by conforming to the "linguistic environment". This reminds me of a term called "code-switching". Sometimes people switch from one style of speaking to another style of speaking in order to adjust to the situation and, in effect, use language that they feel more comfortable with in a particular situation.

    Code-switching - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Code-Switching - English (ESL) Weblog


    Thanks again dear,

    I suppose the term "code switching" sounds great in this case...is this the same term used in CLL methodology?

  4. Mehrgan's Avatar
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    #6

    Thumbs up Re: Jargon or Register?

    Sorry, I didn't notice the second link you posted...I think you've already answered my enquiry...Thanks...


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    #7

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Thanks again dear,

    I suppose the term "code switching" sounds great in this case...is this the same term used in CLL methodology?
    I don't use CLL methodology because I only use English to teach English. In fact, this term is new to me. However, I find it very interesting, and the idea of it just might come in handy someday.

    To answer your question, I suppose one could say that CLL methodology employs a certain kind of code-switching, in a way. I understand how one might make you think of the other. Code-switching mostly occurs within the same language. It would be a matter of switching from the language of one's peer group or neighborhood to more professional or businesslike language used in a conference room, for example. However, I think code-switching can be applied to switching from one language to another language, which is often the case among children of immigrants. For example, around here, some children speak English at school and with their friends, but speak Spanish with their parents and other family members.

    CLL Methodology


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    #8

    Re: Jargon or Register?

    Quote Originally Posted by Mehrgan View Post
    Sorry, I didn't notice the second link you posted...I think you've already answered my enquiry...Thanks...
    You're welcome. No problem.


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