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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    course

    Hello

    - take an introductory course in cooking
    - The school offers an evening course on engineering.
    - graduate [training] courses

    These examples sound natural to American English speakers, don't they? It's natural in American English to use the word "course" in the sense of "a series of classes or lectures in an academic subject or a practical skill," isn't it?

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #2

    Smile Re: course

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello

    - take an introductory course in cooking
    - The school offers an evening course on engineering.
    - graduate [training] courses

    These examples sound natural to American English speakers, don't they? It's natural in American English to use the word "course" in the sense of "a series of classes or lectures in an academic subject or a practical skill," isn't it?

    Thank you.
    It's natural in American English to use the word "course" in the sense of "a series of classes or lectures in an academic subject or a practical skill," isn't it?
    Yes, it is. It's correct and natural.

    The school offers an evening course on engineering.
    I wouldn't use "on" here. I would use "in" - a course in engineering. However, we would say, for example, "a book on engineering".

    I think "an engineering course" sounds better for some reason, though I would find it mighty challenging to explain why.



    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #3

    Re: course

    Do Americans use "course" to mean "a period of study at a college or university that leads to an exam or a qualification"?
    - Tom is beginning a four-year course in chemistry.
    - Students earn the degree after a two-year course of study.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #4

    Re: course

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Do Americans use "course" to mean "a period of study at a college or university that leads to an exam or a qualification"?
    - Tom is beginning a four-year course in chemistry.
    - Students earn the degree after a two-year course of study.

    Tom is beginning a four-year course in chemistry. < This is possible, and it sounds good, but I'm not sure that I've actually heard it. What does Google say? Yeah, that works: "four-year course in chemistry"

    Students earn the degree after a two-year course of study << Yes, this is good.


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    • Join Date: Feb 2008
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    #5

    Re: course

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I wouldn't use "on" here. I would use "in" - a course in engineering. However, we would say, for example, "a book on engineering".
    I would say either is right. But... I would prefer 'in' too.

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