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    #1

    revolutionarily new invention?

    Dear Friends,

    Is there such a thing as a 'revolutionarily new invention'?

    Google Book search gives me only 'revolutionary' new invention. (Although, as I see, 'revolutionarily' can also be followed by a noun/nounphrase, as in:

    e. g. 'revolutionarily' new methods and ideas

    "revolutionarily new invention" - Google Könyvek

    Thank you.

    Palinkasocsi
    Last edited by palinkasocsi; 25-Aug-2009 at 17:44.

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    #2

    Exclamation Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    Dear Friends,

    Is there such a thing as a 'revolutionarily new invention'?

    Google Book search gives me only 'revolutionary' new invention. (Although, as I see, 'revolutionarily' can also be followed by a noun/nounphrase, as in:

    e. g. 'revolutionarily' new methods and ideas

    "revolutionarily new invention" - Google Könyvek

    Thank you.

    Plinkasocsi
    Revolutionarily is an adverb derived from the adjective revolutionary. It can modify a verb, an adjective or an adverb. So it can not be followed by a noun or noun phrase except a verb but can be placed before an adjective or adverb. Example:
    The novel ironing machines and cleaning machines have made house work revolutionarily simple.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 24-Aug-2009 at 10:07.


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    #3

    Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    How about 'revolutionarily new methods' (link above) or 'extremely good example' -- adverb + nounphrase?

    Palinkasocsi

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    #4

    Exclamation Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    How about 'revolutionarily new methods' (link above) or 'extremely good example' -- adverb + nounphrase?

    Palinkasocsi
    You have to use them in sentence to know what is what. Let us see what happens when we put the expressions into sentence having same meaning but in a different way:
    These methods are revolutionarily new.
    This example is extremely good.
    She is extremely beautiful.
    So an adverb when it modifies an adjective is always placed before the adjective it modifies. In your examples the adverbs are placed before the adjectives new and good respectively. Have a look at this sentence:
    I was extreamely facinated with this good example. Here the adverb extreamely is modifying the verb facinated.


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    #5

    Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    No. Your reasoning is shaky. In my example, 'revolutionarily' (adverb) modifies an adjective (new).

    Natives please.

    Palinkasocsi

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    #6

    Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    No. Your reasoning is shaky. In my example, 'revolutionarily' (adverb) modifies an adjective (new).

    Natives please.

    Palinkasocsi
    "Revolutionary new methods" is, in my view, the correct way to say it. I am not familiar with "revolutionarily", if it exists, is an unnecessary created word, and horrible into the bargain.

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    #7

    Exclamation Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    Quote Originally Posted by palinkasocsi View Post
    No. Your reasoning is shaky. In my example, 'revolutionarily' (adverb) modifies an adjective (new).

    Natives please.

    Palinkasocsi
    Where have I denied that? But I did disagree with your querry seeking examples where the word "revolutionarily' is followed by a noun/nounphrase.

    However, as clarified by bhaisahab, 'revolutionarily' is not a good word and is rarely used.


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    #8

    Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    "Revolutionary new methods" is, in my view, the correct way to say it. I am not familiar with "revolutionarily", if it exists, is an unnecessary created word, and horrible into the bargain.
    I'll second that. It's a pointless argument because it's a manufactured word that nobody would use in a hundred years. Use "revolutionary," for heaven's sake.

    I'll bet it would rack up some serious points in a game of Scrabble, though.

    Greg


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    #9

    Re: revolutionarily new invention?

    I accept that 'revolutionarily new method' is odd, but sarat_106's explanation that 'an adverb cannot modify a nounphrase' may run out of steam here. Lo and behold:

    'an extremely (and not extreme) good example'

    Palinkasocsi


    Thanks bhaisahab and dragn, anyway.
    Last edited by palinkasocsi; 25-Aug-2009 at 17:43.

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