Results 1 to 3 of 3

    • Join Date: Sep 2008
    • Posts: 29
    #1

    Noun + noun vs noun of the noun

    Hi, there is a problem I've always had.

    I can't recognise where to use noun + noun or noun of the noun.

    The other day i was writing a private message in a forum and i wrote

    "Can you change my forum account email??" is that good? or shoud I have written the email of my forum account?

    The same with "lower league players" or players of lower leagues.

    Do you know any good site to see how to use each example? or perhaps a killer phrase that can make it clear for me.

    thanks :D


    • Join Date: Jun 2006
    • Posts: 99
    #2

    Re: Noun + noun vs noun of the noun

    Usually, in English, we prefer to put the adjectives before the noun. It means the same thing and is generally understood when you use "of the _________". Perhaps someone else can shed more light on this.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Great Britain
      • Current Location:
      • Russian Federation

    • Join Date: May 2009
    • Posts: 349
    #3

    Re: Noun + noun vs noun of the noun

    Quote Originally Posted by Antigol View Post
    Hi, there is a problem I've always had.

    I can't recognise where to use noun + noun or noun of the noun.

    The other day i was writing a private message in a forum and i wrote

    "Can you change my forum account email??" is that good? or shoud I have written the email of my forum account?

    The same with "lower league players" or players of lower leagues.

    Do you know any good site to see how to use each example? or perhaps a killer phrase that can make it clear for me.

    thanks :D
    Your examples seem fine to me.

    In the noun + noun construction, the first noun is often known as an "attributive noun", if you want to look it up (other terminology is possible, as you will see). It usually corresponds to a postmodifying PP - often with "of", but also many others:

    the study furniture (in the study)
    a Newcastle man (from Newcastle)
    barbecue sausages (for a barbecue)

    It is thus more general than "of" + noun, and modern English uses it a lot.

Similar Threads

  1. Red -- predicate adjective or predicate noun? Or both? (previous post)
    By donnach in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 16-May-2008, 14:51
  2. sentence structure question
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 17-Jan-2008, 10:53
  3. "e-mail"...countable or uncountable
    By pink dragon in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 12
    Last Post: 31-Aug-2005, 02:28
  4. Subject Noun
    By Farhaj in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2005, 12:18
  5. A noun as an adverb
    By pdh0224 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 20
    Last Post: 05-Jun-2004, 20:06

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •