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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
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      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: May 2004
    • Posts: 39
    #1

    2 questions

    Dear Teachers,]

    What do the following expressions mean?

    1)" When A zigs, B zags. " Does this mean that A and B move in opposite directions,or, does it simply mean that B reacts whenever there is a change in A?
    2) What does "To lay big wood on something" mean?

    Thank you.

    YY

  1. #2

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    Dear Teachers,]

    What do the following expressions mean?

    1)" When A zigs, B zags. " Does this mean that A and B move in opposite directions,or, does it simply mean that B reacts whenever there is a change in A?
    2) What does "To lay big wood on something" mean?

    Thank you.

    YY
    I think it could really be either one or the other depending on the context. To zigzag is to make a series of sharp twists and turns in different directions. Since your A does the zigs and B that does the zags, to me they are simply alternating their movements either at the same time or in succession - first one then the other.

    To lay a big wood on something...to bet heavily on something, wood meaning money and it's a slang word.


    • Join Date: Jun 2004
    • Posts: 1,369
    #3

    Re: 2 questions

    To me, this means that B does the opposite of A.
    E.g.
    If your opponent plays prudently, you must be fairly aggressive, while if he's aggressive himself, you should become more prudent.

    FRC

  2. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #4

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    1) "When A zigs, B zags." Does this mean that A and B move in opposite directions, or does it simply mean that B reacts whenever there is a change in A?
    Yuri, both your suggestions are correct.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yuri Yoshikuni
    2) What does "To lay big wood on something" mean?
    I agree with Maryin's explanation. "money" is made from paper, and paper is made from trees. Trees are made of wood.

  3. #5

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Yuri, both your suggestions are correct.



    I agree with Maryin's explanation. "money" is made from paper, and paper is made from trees. Trees are made of wood.
    Well, interestingly enough, wood actually refers to large wooden barrels in which liquor was stored in the 19th century. I also had the paper connection in mind too but I checked around just for the hell of it and that's what I came up with. You never know....

  4. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #6

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Marylin
    Well, interestingly enough, wood actually refers to large wooden barrels in which liquor was stored in the 19th century. I also had the paper connection in mind too but I checked around just for the hell of it and that's what I came up with. You never know....
    Gee, now I'm confused. Doesn't 'big wood' refer to a stack of money? That is, it's the thickness of the slab of wood that is being equated with the thickness of a stack of bills?

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
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    #7

    Re: 2 questions

    In BrE, we talk of 'wad' not 'wood'.

  5. Casiopea's Avatar

    • Join Date: Sep 2003
    • Posts: 12,970
    #8

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by tdol
    In BrE, we talk of 'wad' not 'wood'.
    In North America, it's 'wad', too. A wadding of X (e.g., a wad of bills), a bundle of banknotes.

    ------------------
    Got any you don't need?

  6. #9

    Re: 2 questions

    Quote Originally Posted by Casiopea
    Gee, now I'm confused. Doesn't 'big wood' refer to a stack of money? That is, it's the thickness of the slab of wood that is being equated with the thickness of a stack of bills?
    Well, I am pretty sure that it's not the case, Casiopea. Before seeing Yuri's post, I have honestly never heard that expression before. But then again, it all depends on where you live. My other guess was that if you lay the big wood on something you give it a big shot by whacking the ball with a baseball bat and hitting a homerun. However, online context proves otherwise. Poking around some more I found out the slangish part of the phrase. I hope this is it.

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