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    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    tag question

    WHY? Ex: nobody comes here, HAS THEY?

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    Re: tag question

    Quote Originally Posted by cactus20113 View Post
    WHY? Ex: nobody comes here, HAS THEY?

    do you want to know the right form of the verb come in your question?

    Have a good day.

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    Re: tag question

    I 'd like to know " HAS " is with " THEY" ?

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    Re: tag question

    We still don't have the first clue what you're trying to ask, so I''ll take the shotgun approach and just correct everything in sight.

    The sentence "Nobody comes, has they?" is completely wrong. Here are some correct possibilities from which you may pick and choose. Bon appétit.

    Nobody comes, do they? (present tense, habitual; unspecified gender)
    Nobody has come, have they? (present perfect, up until now; unspecified gender)
    He hasn't come, has he? (present perfect; singular male)
    She hasn't come, has she? (present perfect; singular female)

    It occurs to me that you (or others reading this thread) may be wondering why a sentence such as "Nobody has come, have they?" uses a singular form in the stem (nobody) while the tag uses plural forms (have and they). It does so because that's the rule:

    If the subject in the stem is nobody, no one, anybody, anyone, somebody, someone, everybody, everyone, none, or neither, use the plural pronoun they in the tag. For example:

    Nobody knows who did it, do they?
    No one should beat their kids, should they?
    Anybody can do arithmetic, can't they?
    Anyone with half a brain would know better, wouldn't they?
    Somebody broke the copy machine, didn't they?
    Someone is bringing the beer, aren't they?
    Everybody knows John, don't they?
    Everyone will be there, won't they?
    None have been found, have they?
    Neither is worth anything, are they?

    The basic problem is that English has no personal pronouns that refer to a single person of unspecified gender: all we have is he/him and she/her. In certain situations, one acceptable alternative is to default to the plural forms they/them. That's presumably what's happening here.

    Last edited by dragn; 27-Aug-2009 at 11:14.

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