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    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Korean
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      • South Korea
      • Current Location:
      • South Korea

    • Join Date: Sep 2006
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    #1

    when

    I would like to know the difference between "when(1)" and "when(2)".

    1. We take the bus to school when it rains
    2. Organ donation is when a person living or dead allows his or her organs to be used in another person.

    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • United States

    • Join Date: Jun 2009
    • Posts: 1,517
    #2

    Re: when

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between "when(1)" and "when(2)".

    1. We take the bus to school when it rains
    2. Organ donation is when a person living or dead allows his or her organs to be used in another person.
    1. If it rains we take the bus to school. Whenever it rains, we take the bus to school.
    2. Organ donations mean the following: a person living or dead ...

    I think the difference is very slight and trick to be recognised.
    In Portuguese both "when" words in situations (1) and (2) would be translated to the same word ("quando"). But in German, we have two different words ("wenn" and "wann"). So thinking in German, we could say:
    1. We take the bus to school if it rains.

    What about your language, do you translate the two "when"s above to different words?


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: when

    Quote Originally Posted by wowenglish1 View Post
    I would like to know the difference between "when(1)" and "when(2)".

    1. We take the bus to school when it rains
    2. Organ donation is when a person living or dead allows his or her organs to be used in another person.
    The use of "when" in your second sentence would not come across as the best usage of this word. I don't recommend it. I'm all for certain forms of colloquial usage and informal style. However, I'm not fond of this particular use of "when".

    I would rewrite your second example sentence like this:

    Organ donation means that people will allow their organs to be used in another person after they die. It has to be after they die, however.

    Organ donation means that people agree to let doctors use their organs for other people after they die.

    Organ donation is allowing your organs to be used by other people after you die.

    An explanation for this already exists in a usage note in the American Heritage Dictionary, so I'd recommend reading it for a clear understanding of this particular usage of "when".

    when: Definition from Answers.com+

    USAGE NOTE In informal style when is often used after forms of be in definitions: A dilemma is when you don't know which way to turn. Although useful, this construction is widely regarded as incorrect or unsuitable for formal discourse. In formal style such definitions should be recast to eliminate is when, either by supplying generic term that may be modified by a restrictive adjective clause (A dilemma is a situation in which you don't know which way to turn) or by making the when-clause adverbial (You are in a dilemma when you don't know which way to turn).
    Last edited by PROESL; 02-Sep-2009 at 14:38.

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