Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11
  1. Newbie
    Student or Learner

    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #1

    Is there a difference?

    Is there a difference between these two statements:
    1. I will work when you get here.
    And 2. I will be working when you get here.

    Thank You.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #2

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by reja View Post
    Is there a difference between these two statements:
    1. I will work when you get here.
    And 2. I will be working when you get here.

    Thank You.
    1. Means "when you arrive, I will start work".
    2. Means "when you arrive, I will already have started work".

  3. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #3

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    1. Means "when you arrive, I will start work".
    2. Means "when you arrive, I will already have started work".
    working?

  4. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #4

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    working?
    "I will be working" means "I will be in the process of carrying out work'. In French "Je serais en train de travailler". Sorry, I don't know Portugese.

  5. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #5

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "I will be working" means "I will be in the process of carrying out work'.
    yes
    1. Means "when you arrive, I will start work".
    2. Means "when you arrive, I will already have started work".

    in this particular case, is 'work' a verb?

    Would I be wrong whether I had said...

    when you arrive, I will start my work
    when you arrive, I will already have started my work
    when you arrive, I will start working
    when you arrive, I will already have started work
    ing


    Thank you.

  6. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #6

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    1. Means "when you arrive, I will start work".
    2. Means "when you arrive, I will already have started work".

    in this particular case, is 'work' a verb?

    Would I be wrong whether I had said...

    when you arrive, I will start my work
    when you arrive, I will already have started my work
    when you arrive, I will start working
    when you arrive, I will already have started working

    Thank you.
    when you arrive, I would already have started my work

    when you arrive, I would already have started working

    These sound better, I doubt usage of "will" is correct in the obove mentioned constructions.

  7. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #7

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    1. Means "when you arrive, I will start work".
    2. Means "when you arrive, I will already have started work".

    in this particular case, is 'work' a verb? No, it's a noun.

    Would I be wrong whether I had said...

    when you arrive, I will start my work
    when you arrive, I will already have started my work
    when you arrive, I will start working
    when you arrive, I will already have started work
    ing


    Thank you.
    All your examples are correct.

  8. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,615
    #8

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    when you arrive, I would already have started my work

    when you arrive, I would already have started working

    These sound better, I doubt usage of "will" is correct in the obove mentioned constructions.
    "Will" is the correct word to use, "would" is too conditional in these sentences.

  9. Offroad's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil

    • Join Date: Feb 2008
    • Posts: 2,817
    #9

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    All your examples are correct.
    Then I must have misunderstood your previous post. I thought my sentences might be odd due to the use of 'when'. It made me create another thread, I will try to delete it, If I can't, ignore it.


    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 4
    #10

    Re: Is there a difference?

    Quote Originally Posted by reja View Post
    Is there a difference between these two statements:
    1. I will work when you get here.
    And 2. I will be working when you get here.

    Thank You.
    Well, i think in the first sentence:I will work when you get here it means that you are not going to work untill he get there.

    Whereas in the second sentence:I will be working when you get here.it means that you are going to work before he gets there and when he show up he'll find you working
    if i am wrong please let some one state

Page 1 of 2 1 2 LastLast

Similar Threads

  1. difference in meaning?
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 04-Mar-2010, 09:19
  2. "Difference Between" or "the difference between"
    By cherran in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 07-Oct-2009, 15:43
  3. [Idiom] The difference gets tacked onto the principal?
    By eliang in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 19-Dec-2008, 18:30
  4. difference between tense and aspect
    By Unregistered in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 23-Oct-2008, 12:26
  5. mean the difference
    By KLPNO in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 21-Oct-2008, 18:34

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •