Results 1 to 6 of 6

    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    "forget someone" and "forget about someone"



    Hello.

    - Mary can't forget Bob.
    - Mary can't forget about Bob.

    Do you think that both are grammatically correct? Are they different in meaning?

    Thank you.


  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #2

    Re: "forget someone" and "forget about someone"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post


    Hello.

    - Mary can't forget Bob.
    - Mary can't forget about Bob.

    Do you think that both are grammatically correct? Are they different in meaning?

    Thank you.

    Yes, they are both correct, and they mean essentially the same.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: "forget someone" and "forget about someone"

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post


    Hello.

    - Mary can't forget Bob.
    - Mary can't forget about Bob.

    Do you think that both are grammatically correct? Are they different in meaning?

    Thank you.

    They do essentially mean the same thing. However, "forget about Bob" is more likely if we mean to say that Mary can't stop thinking about Bob.

    forget about Bob - ideas, memories, and anything that has to do with Bob - anything at all surrounding the memory of Bob, things related to Bob and things that remind Mary of Bob.

    forget Bob - Without "about" the focus is just on Bob and things, or anything that makes one think "about" Bob.


    - Mary can't forget Bob. -

    - Mary can't forget about Bob. - Mary can't stop thinking about Bob.

    If Bob moves away or passes away I think "Mary can't forget about Bob" is more likely to be spoken than "Mary can't forget Bob".

    Let's say Bob and Mary break up after a long time together.

    Mary - Hi Bob.

    Bob - Hi Mary.

    Mary - So how've you been?

    Bob - All right, I guess. I'm really surprised to hear from you.

    Mary - Well, I just couldn't forget about you.

    Bob - Yeah ... well ...

    Now, for my money "I just couldn't forget about you" sounds more like natural English than simply saying "I couldn't forget you", which is simpler and gives no indication that there's more to "Bob" than just teh plain and simple memory of Bob. There are things about Bob - maybe a number of things.

    My notion is confirmed, more or less, by observing which phrase people use on the Internet more.


    "forget about him" - Google Search


    Results 1 - 10 of about 7,340,000 for "forget about him".


    "forget him" - Google Search

    Results 1 - 10 of about 1,130,000 for "forget him".
    Last edited by PROESL; 03-Sep-2009 at 02:20.

  2. bhaisahab's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Ireland

    • Join Date: Apr 2008
    • Posts: 25,590
    #4

    Re: "forget someone" and "forget about someone"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    They do essentially mean the same thing. However, "forget about Bob" is more likely if we mean to say that Mary can't stop thinking about Bob.

    forget about Bob - ideas, memories, and anything that has to do with Bob - anything at all surrounding the memory of Bob, things related to Bob and things that remind Mary about Bob.

    forget Bob - Without "about" the focus is just on Bob and things, or anything that makes one think "about" Bob.


    - Mary can't forget Bob. -

    - Mary can't forget about Bob. - Mary can't stop thinking about Bob.

    If Bob moves away or passes away I think "Mary can't forget about Bob" is more likely to spoken than "Mary can't forget Bob".

    Let's Bob and Mary break up after a long time together.

    Mary - Hi Bob.

    Bob - Hi Mary.

    Mary - So how've you been?

    Bob - All right, I guess. I'm really surprised to hear from you.

    Mary - Well, I just couldn't forget about you.

    Bob - Yeah ... well ...

    Now, for my money "I just couldn't forget about you" sounds more like natural English than simply saying "I couldn't forget you", which is simpler and gives no indication that there's more to "Bob" than just teh plain and simple memory of Bob. There are things about Bob - maybe a number of things.

    My notion is confirmed, more or less, by observing which phrase people use on the Internet more.


    "forget about him" - Google Search


    Results 1 - 10 of about 7,340,000 for "forget about him".


    "forget him" - Google Search

    Results 1 - 10 of about 1,130,000 for "forget him".


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #5

    Re: "forget someone" and "forget about someone"

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post


  3. misiania's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 243
    #6

    Re: "forget someone" and "forget about someone"

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •