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    #1

    incorporated under legal form

    Is this sentence correct?

    As regards international sports governing bodies, they have the status of non-governmental organizations under international law, and most of them indicate in their statutes the legal form of national law under which they are incorporated.

    The sentence is a more or less direct translation from French. I'm not sure whether one can say "incorporated under a legal form"; it doesn't sound wrong to me.

    Thanks.

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    #2

    Re: incorporated under legal form

    I would remove 'legal form' unless it's a standard phrase in English legal language as it adds nothing to me and makes things harder to understand.

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    #3

    Re: incorporated under legal form

    I don't understand how you could come to the conclusion that "legal form" doesn't add anything to the sentence. So, to you, there's no difference between "international sports governing bodies indicate in their statutes the national law under which they are incorporated" and "international sports governing bodies indicate in their statutes the legal form of national law under which they are incorporated." The latter sentence is more specific because we know that international sports governing bodies indicate not only the national law under which they are incorporated, but also their legal form (e.g. limited liability company).

    Essentially, my question is whether one can say that an organization is incorporated under a certain legal form. Obviously, one could say that an organization is incorporated as, for example, a limited liability company, but that would not work in my sentence.

    Thanks.

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    #4

    Re: incorporated under legal form

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I don't understand how you could come to the conclusion that "legal form" doesn't add anything to the sentence. So, to you, there's no difference between "international sports governing bodies indicate in their statutes the national law under which they are incorporated" and "international sports governing bodies indicate in their statutes the legal form of national law under which they are incorporated." The latter sentence is more specific because we know that international sports governing bodies indicate not only the national law under which they are incorporated, but also their legal form (e.g. limited liability company).

    Essentially, my question is whether one can say that an organization is incorporated under a certain legal form. Obviously, one could say that an organization is incorporated as, for example, a limited liability company, but that would not work in my sentence.

    Thanks.
    Yes, it's quite normal to say that an organization is incorporated under a certain legal form.

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    #5

    Re: incorporated under legal form

    Quote Originally Posted by Jasmin165 View Post
    I don't understand how you could come to the conclusion that "legal form" doesn't add anything to the sentence.
    If you do a search on Google for "legal form of national law" there are just four examples, one of which is this thread, which suggests that this is not a standard phrase in English, especially as two of the others are translations from German. If this were the normal or standard legal phrase, would there not be more examples than this?

    This is the search I used, with personalised results switched off.

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