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  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #1

    newly

    Dear friends...

    Do these phases sound good?

    a newly-born baby
    a newly-married couple
    the just-married couple travelled to Scotland on their honey-moon.
    the recently-married couple decided to buy a new house over the beach.
    the freshly-married couples decided for sharing this area of the island.
    the latterly(lately)-married couple dicided to adopt a 2-year-old boy.


    Thank you


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    #2

    Re: newly

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Dear friends...

    Do these phases sound good?

    a newly-born baby
    a newly-married couple
    the just-married couple travelled to Scotland on their honey-moon.
    the recently-married couple decided to buy a new house over the beach.
    the freshly-married couples decided for sharing this area of the island.
    the latterly(lately)-married couple dicided to adopt a 2-year-old boy.

    Thank you
    a newly-born baby - This is usually "a newborn baby". I doubt anyone would say "a newly-born baby".
    a newly-married couple - We usually say "newlyweds" for this.
    the just-married couple travelled to Scotland on their honey-moon. - We say "a recently married couple" not "a just married couple".
    the recently-married couple decided to buy a new house over the beach. - This is okay, of course.
    the freshly-married couples decided for sharing this area of the island. - No, "freshly" doesn't work here.
    the latterly(lately)-married couple decided to adopt a 2-year-old boy. - No, this one is not good. Use this phrase: "the recently married couple".

    Post any follow-up questions you have, but these are the phrases that we use for the things you want to say here.


  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: newly

    I was almost positive that 'just' would collocate with 'married'.

    As to 'recently' and 'newly', I believe either would too.

    Regarding the rest, I just thought, once they are synonymous, they could be used interchangeably.


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    #4

    Re: newly

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Regarding the rest, I just thought, once they are synonymous, they could be used interchangeably.
    To me, that can be the trickiest part about language: knowing how words go together. Grammar is important, but it's not nearly the whole picture, of course. Vocabulary presents a far greater challenge than grammar, or I should "lexical knowledge" presents a far greater challenge. Grammar has limitations. There's only so much of it. Vocabulary is unlimited.

    You could say "they just got married". That's okay.

  3. Offroad's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: newly

    That it isn't just married people who can have positive, loving, and caring relationships, and that marriages

    the Ohio legislature passed a law allowing joint tenants, rather than just married people, to co-sign loans.

    Donald Trump invited the newly married couple to his Palm Beach palace called Mar-A-Lago

    the girl said, pointing at the newly married couple, at the bear's fat little belly.

    Grammar has limitations. There's only so much of it. Vocabulary is unlimited.


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    #6

    Re: newly

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    That it isn't just married people who can have positive, loving, and caring relationships, and that marriages

    the Ohio legislature passed a law allowing joint tenants, rather than just married people, to co-sign loans.

    Donald Trump invited the newly married couple to his Palm Beach palace called Mar-A-Lago

    the girl said, pointing at the newly married couple, at the bear's fat little belly.


    In this case "just" means "only", so it's okay. It doesn't work when "just" means recently.

    The phrase "newly married couple" is good in those sentences. However, presented as an isolated phrase, the first thing that comes to mind for me is "newlywed", which, as an isolated phrase or word, seems to be more familiar and common than "newly married couple". In these example sentences, however, "newly married couple" is, of course, correct. I would use a hypen, though: "newly-married couple".


  4. Offroad's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: newly

    Hmm...

    It made me feel like an old sock! A REAL BARGAIN My just married son decided to build a wall in his back garden and went along to a

    advised me: "Selling life insurance is easy!" he said, "Find a young guy, just married , see. Buy him a cup of coffee or a beer, and after a bit you say, "Do you love your wife?"


    OK. OK. Jane. Back to the young couple just married, love to travel. A question here. Yes. I was wondering

    And you watch carefully? the man who is just married is wanting to fight? you know him from before.


    The second example is quite interesting.


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    #8

    Re: newly

    Quote Originally Posted by marciobarbalho View Post
    Hmm...

    It made me feel like an old sock! A REAL BARGAIN My just married son decided to build a wall in his back garden and went along to a

    advised me: "Selling life insurance is easy!" he said, "Find a young guy, just married , see. Buy him a cup of coffee or a beer, and after a bit you say, "Do you love your wife?"

    OK. OK. Jane. Back to the young couple just married, love to travel. A question here. Yes. I was wondering

    And you watch carefully? the man who is just married is wanting to fight? you know him from before.

    The second example is quite interesting.
    It made me feel like an old sock! A REAL BARGAIN My just married son decided to build a wall in his back garden and went along to a <<

    Here, I would have said, "my son, who just got married, decided ...- no passive voice - awkward and not necessary. Or it could be good to say, "my son, who was just married, decided". Okay, it's passive voice, but it's a lot better than "my just married son". I don't think this is good sentence formation in both written and spoken language. I can hear how it might come up in ordinary, everyday, informal conversation, however.

    advised me: "Selling life insurance is easy!" he said, "Find a young guy, just married , see. Buy him a cup of coffee or a beer, and after a bit you say, "Do you love your wife?"

    In this sentence "just married" is an informal shortening of "who just got married" in my opinion, and very much reflects spoken language rather than written language. So it would seem okay there.

    OK. OK. Jane. Back to the young couple just married, love to travel. A question here. Yes. I was wondering <<

    I would say the same thing for this one as the one above it.

    And you watch carefully? the man who is just married is wanting to fight? you know him from before. <<

    I think this is an unnecessary use of passive voice, so much so that to me the sentence sounds a bit awkward, to say the least. I don't imagine coming up with a sentence like this on my own. A better phrase is "the man who just got married". Now, some people don't like to use "get" this way, but there's absolutely nothing wrong with it. It's better than "the man who is just married".

    Yes, this is an interesting one. The verb "want" is not usually a progressive verb. I would not use it this way. It's not part of my natural language.

    There's a lot of gray area in language from time to time, isn't there?

    Last edited by PROESL; 04-Sep-2009 at 02:17.

  5. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: newly

    Just a side note: With adjectives that end in -ly, most style guides say you should NOT hyphenate. That is, "a recently married couple," not "a recently-married couple."

    I'll leave it in PROESL's capable hands to continue the discussion on which phrasing is most common/accepted/expected in which situations.


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    #10

    Re: newly

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    Just a side note: With adjectives that end in -ly, most style guides say you should NOT hyphenate. That is, "a recently married couple," not "a recently-married couple."

    I'll leave it in PROESL's capable hands to continue the discussion on which phrasing is most common/accepted/expected in which situations.
    I agree. Thanks for pointing that out. However, there's just one more thing. Newly is an adverb (not an adjective), and while it's okay to hypenate "ly" adjectives to form a compound, it is recommended that we not hyphenate adverbs, which, of course, end in ly. With this in mind, it seems odd how English can produce such a compound word as "newlywed". mm ...

    What's your take on this? http://www.tedmontgomery.com/punctuation/hyphen-b.html - I slipped and used a hypen with an adverb, but I agree with the writer of this webpage.

    When the first word of a two-word modifier ends in ly, hyphenate the compound if the ly word acts as one idea with the second word and if the ly word can be used alone with the noun (i.e., if the ly word is an adjective).
    • There goes a friendly-looking man. (hyphenation, since “friendly” modifies “looking” and is an adjective describing “man”)
    • You sure are a friendly little girl. (no hyphenation, since “friendly” does not act as one idea with “little”)
    • This is a very brightly lit room. (no hyphenation, since “brightly” is an adverb and does not modify “room”)
    Last edited by PROESL; 04-Sep-2009 at 04:10.

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