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    #1

    go to pieces

    Hi

    Mark always goes to pieces with his son.

    --- Does it mean that they always have an argument with each other?

  1. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: go to pieces

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Mark always goes to pieces with his son.

    --- Does it mean that they always have an argument with each other?
    It's hard to say without further context. The sentence doesn't sound natural.
    If someone "goes to pieces", it usually means they "fall apart" mentally, or have a minor nervous breakdown.

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: go to pieces

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hi

    Mark always goes to pieces with his son.

    --- Does it mean that they always have an argument with each other?
    It is a phrase which has both literal as well as figurative meaning;

    Literal is: something] to fall apart into many pieces.
    The glass went into pieces after falling down from her hand.
    • Figurative: for something to become nonfunctional:
    All her hopes and ideas went to pieces in that one meeting.
    • Fig: for someone to have a mental collapse or became so upset that they are unable to control their feelings or think clearly.
    Fred went to pieces during the trial
    He was quite throughout the funeral, but went to pieces after every one left.
    The example sentence can have a similar meaning to portion underlined but as pointed out by Raymott, it dose not sound natural. I think it could be:
    Mark always goes to pieces with the unbecoming/unruly behavior of his son.

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: go to pieces

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    Mark always goes to pieces with the unbecoming/unruly behavior of his son.
    Yes, but I'd use "over", not "with".
    It's possible to go to pieces over something, generally not with something.

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: go to pieces

    It may yet be a Midlands expression for laughing intensely, having loads of fun.

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    #6

    Re: go to pieces

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    It may yet be a Midlands expression for laughing intensely, having loads of fun.
    "Laugh? ah'll tell y'man ah fair went t' pieces". Seems a bit more Geordie than Midlands (of England)

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    #7

    Re: go to pieces

    You'd know better than I, but my Midlands auntie said things like that sometimes.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: go to pieces

    Quote Originally Posted by bhaisahab View Post
    "Laugh? ah'll tell y'man ah fair went t' pieces". Seems a bit more Geordie than Midlands (of England)
    Yes, I agree that's another meaning. I'd still use "over", not "with".
    The context would probably indicate the manner and direction in which your composure was unravelling.

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