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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    Exclamation would vs will

    Hello there.

    Could you explain the difference to me?

    I would love to help you.
    I will love to help you. → I have never heard of this one, though.

    It would cost $1,000.
    It will cost $1,000.


    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #2

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by gchman View Post
    Hello there.

    Could you explain the difference to me?

    I would love to help you.
    I will love to help you. → I have never heard of this one, though.

    Thank you.
    I would love to help you. - This could be sincere, or the tentativeness and emphasis on possibility - more distant possibility - could make it very easy to follow it with with another clause. Here's what I mean: I would love to help, but I've got an important business meeting that night. This means, "If I didn't have an important business meeting that night, I would help you." This second conditional sentence makes this is a closed possibility. It's not possible because "I have a business meeting that night".

    I will love to help you. → I have never heard of this one, though. - I haven't heard it either. I simply wouldn't use it.

    It doesn't make sense to do this with "will" because "will" can be used to present an open possibility. "If I don't have anything else to do, I will love to help you". Using "will love" in this context is strange. Just say, "If I don't have anything else to do, I'll help you". This means, "But I could have something else to do". Therefore, we see how "will" presents an open possibility and "would" gives us a closed possibility.
    Last edited by PROESL; 07-Sep-2009 at 04:36.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #3

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by gchman View Post
    Hello there.

    Could you explain the difference to me?

    It would cost $1,000.
    It will cost $1,000.

    Thank you.

    It would cost $1,000. = It would cost $1,000 if we bought it. - Here we can use "would" to express an open possibility, but this statement - a second conditional - expresses a more distant possibility and does not express as much optimism about the proposition of buying it. This statement is more speculative. There's no rush to make a decision.


    It will cost $1,000. = If we buy it, it will cost $1,000. - Well, let's make a decision. Do we want to buy it? We've got the money. Will it be worth it? Is it a good deal?

    Using "will" expresses more optimism about the possibility of buying it. The possibility is closer.

    The meaning of "want" is at the center of both "will" and "would", though we do, of course, use "will" and "would" to express many ideas.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #4

    Re: would vs will

    Second Conditional A

    It would cost $1,000. = It would cost $1,000 if we bought it. - Here we can use "would" to express an open possibility, but this statement - a second conditional - expresses a more distant possibility and does not express as much optimism about the proposition of buying it. This statement is more speculative. There's no rush to make a decision.
    Second Conditional B

    I would love to help you. - This could be sincere, or the tentativeness and emphasis on possibility - more distant possibility - could make it very easy to follow it with with another clause. Here's what I mean: I would love to help, but I've got an important business meeting that night. This means, "If I didn't have an important business meeting that night, I would help you." This second conditional sentence makes this is a closed possibility. It's not possible because "I have a business meeting that night".
    So we can see there are really two second conditionals:

    Second conditional A expresses a distant possibility, but still an open possibility. However, the possibility is more distant and there is less optimism expressed. Using "will" brings the possibility closer and is a more optimistic expression about a proposition set forth by the speaker.

    Second conditional B expresses a far more distant possibility, and the speaker has already decided that this possibility is entirely closed and will remain closed: I have a meeting. I can't help you. I won't help. It's not going to happen. However, if I didn't have a meeting, I would help you.

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    #5

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I will love to help you. → I have never heard of this one, though. - I haven't heard it either. I simply wouldn't use.
    A telephone conversation:
    A: I can't understand quite well the usage of 'will' & 'would', this English grammar book is getting on my nerves. Would you mind droping by tomorrow to give me a hand?
    B: I would love to help you, but unfortunatelly tomorrow I will be busy all day long studying 'shall' & 'should' usage. I think I have some free time the day after tomorrow, what do you say?
    A: Oh, that would be perfect! Could you come the day after tomorrow?
    B: Sure, I will love to help you, that's one of my favorite topics in English grammar.

    Does 'I will love to help you' fit well in the context above?


    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #6

    Smile Re: would vs will

    I got it.
    Your examples are helpful.
    Thank you very much.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #7

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    A telephone conversation:
    A: I can't understand quite well the usage of 'will' & 'would', this English grammar book is getting on my nerves. Would you mind droping by tomorrow to give me a hand?
    B: I would love to help you, but unfortunatelly tomorrow I will be busy all day long studying 'shall' & 'should' usage. I think I have some free time the day after tomorrow, what do you say?
    A: Oh, that would be perfect! Could you come the day after tomorrow?
    B: Sure, I will love to help you, that's one of my favorite topics in English grammar.

    Does 'I will love to help you' fit well in the context above?
    Okay, this is not easy to understand, but I'll try to explain.

    Let's start with "would like", as in "I would like to help you". This means "I want to help you". Despite the use of "would" in hypothetical expressions, there is nothing hypothetical at all about "I would like to help you". With the verb "love" being similar to "like" in some respects, "I would love to help you" essentially means, "I want to help you" or "I really do want to help you".

    Now, let's look at "I will like to help you". This is a grammatically and structurally sound sentence, but it is not at all a substitute for "I would like to help you".

    The same thing can be said of "I would love to help you" compared to "I will love to help you".

    The phrases "I will like to help you" and "I will love to help you" simply don't cut it at all as something that can mean "I want to help you". The phrases "I would like" and "I would love" only occupy the position of expressing what one wants by way of this sort of modality.

    "I would like" and "I would love" are simply polite substitutions for "I want". And using "will" in place of "would" simply does not work. There's no real grammatical explanation for this. Think of "would like" and "would love" as semi-fixed phrases that mean "want".

    White ink; use your mouse to highlight it: Shhh .. I'm going to use Portuguese. It's like "Eu gostaria de ajudar". I don't think you would say "Eu gostará de ajudar", would you? If you want to continue this in Portuguese, go to Other Languages.


    Would you like another beer? Yes, I would, thank you.
    Hey, ya wanna another beer? Yeah, sure. (Do you want another beer?)
    Would you like another beer? Yeah, I'd love one!

    Now, we can look once again at all four phrases outside of the context of expressing "want".

    • If I saw this movie, do you think I would like it?
    • If I went to the ballet, do you think I would love it as much as you? Probably not.
    • If I see this movie, do you think I'll like it?
    • If I go to the ballet, do you think I'll love it as much as you? Probably not.
    Does 'I will love to help you' fit well in the context above?
    The short answer is no, it does not.
    Last edited by PROESL; 07-Sep-2009 at 04:39.

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    #8

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Okay, this is not easy to understand, but I'll try to explain.
    I am aware of the situations you elicited. In the example from my previous post I wanted to pass the following idea:

    " I would love to help you, but unfortunatelly tomorrow I will be busy
    " -> The speaker is willing to help, but is not able to do so. He means if it depended only on him, he would help, however, because of external factors, that is not going to happen.
    "Sure, I will love to help you, that's one of my favorite topics" -> And here the speaker wants to emphasise that now, due to a fortuity change, the action is really going to happen.

    That is the idea I was trying to pass. If that usage does not pass such idea, would you please point out how could I change the dialog in order to do so?
    Last edited by Abstract Idea; 07-Sep-2009 at 14:15. Reason: typo correction


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    #9

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by ymnisky View Post
    I am aware of the situations you elicited. In the example from my previous post I wanted to pass the following idea:

    " I would love to help you, but unfortunatelly tomorrow I will be busy" -> The speaker is willing to help, but is not able to do so. He means if it depended only on him, he would help, however, because of external factors, that is not going to happen.
    "Sure, I will love to help you, that's one of my favorite topics" -> And here the speaker want to emphasise that now, due to a fortuity change, the action is really going to happen.

    That is the idea I was trying to pass. If that usage does not pass such idea, would you please point out how could I change the dialog in order to do so?

    Okay, now I understand better what you are asking - I think.

    This is more typical phrasing for what you want to say:

    Sure, I'll love helping you with that. It's one of my favorite grammar topics.

    Sure, I'm going to love helping you with that. It's one of my favorite grammar topics.

    Sure, that'll be great! It's one of my favorite grammar topics.

    Sure! Oh, yes! I'll simply love helping you. My mind enters a state of euphoria when I talk about that grammar topic. It's just so awesome!


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    #10

    Re: would vs will

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I would love to help you. - This could be sincere, or the tentativeness and emphasis on possibility - more distant possibility - could make it very easy to follow it with with another clause. Here's what I mean: I would love to help, but I've got an important business meeting that night. This means, "If I didn't have an important business meeting that night, I would help you." This second conditional sentence makes this is a closed possibility. It's not possible because "I have a business meeting that night".
    Man, am I high!! I just got on a new horse tonight and man 'o man DOES SHE HAVE WHEELS, ... AND HORSEPOWER, gigantic!! Just touch her with your heels and it's like you're on a rocket sled. Feisty, but easy to rein. She backs almost as fast as she moves forward. Musta been a roping horse. Smart as the dickens, really learns quickly. Some good times a comin'!.

    I'd say that "I would love to help you" can also be glossed as a full on reality. The speaker has every intention of helping but they use 'would' because they don't want to appear to be too forward.

    1. Imagine you met a new girl or guy and she/he asked for your help. It's highly likely that a 'would' would be used.

    [I used 'would' after 'would' and phrase it in a tentative fashion because I didn't want to appear like a know-it-all]

    2. Imagine you met a new girl or guy and she/he asked for your help. A person will use 'would' in such a situation because they don't want to be too forward.

    [I restated this in 2, in a more blunt fashion which might illustrate that I'm very sure of myself or I'm not particularly concerned about what other people have written {I am of course, concerned but I'm trying to highlight some differences}.

    I will love to help you. → I have never heard of this one, though. - I haven't heard it either. I simply wouldn't use it.

    Proesl: Think of "would like" and "would love" as semi-fixed phrases that mean "want".
    Yes, "would like/love to do sth" is a frozen formula.

    I think that 'will' is just too pointed, too forward for what sounds like a "polite" situation. It's certainly grammatical, but the choice of lexical verb pushes the tone towards more tentative.

    As Proesl pointed out, change the lexical verbs to make the situation less "polite" and 'will' works.

    "I'll help you."

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