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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Exclamation Loosing memory

    Hi,

    Can I use loosing with memory?

    These days I have been loosing memory.

    Is this sentince appropriate?

    Thanks

  2. Offroad's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Loosing memory

    No. You can have

    It's lost memory.

    It's been losing memory.


    'lose', say it /looz/
    'loose', say it /loos/

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: Loosing memory

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Can I use loosing with memory?

    These days I have been loosing memory.

    Is this sentince appropriate?

    Thanks
    As marciobarbalho said, it's 'losing'. You can only use 'losing memory' in a very specific sense - with regard to a computer program. If the memory is something that a person has, it needs a possessive - examples: 'I think I'm losing my memory', 'Poor thing, she's losing her memory'.

    b

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Loosing memory

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    As marciobarbalho said, it's 'losing'. You can only use 'losing memory' in a very specific sense - with regard to a computer program. If the memory is something that a person has, it needs a possessive - examples: 'I think I'm losing my memory', 'Poor thing, she's losing her memory'.

    b
    Of course, both computers and humans can have 'memory loss'.
    But computers don't become amnesic.

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: Loosing memory

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Of course, both computers and humans can have 'memory loss'.
    But computers don't become amnesic.
    The usage I was referring to was when a program allocates RAM, uses it, and doesn't make it available again. The longer the program, or the affected module, is running, the sooner the compute runs out of memory.

    This sort of problem could be referred to as 'memory loss', though it's more commonly* referred to as 'a memory leak'.

    b

    PS For geeks:

    Not very commonly at all nowadays, as most modern programming languages have procedures to stop it happening. Java, for example, has a thing called the Garbage Collector that regularly polls memory looking for bits that haven't been used 'recently' and making them available again. With an older language such as C, the program had to make a malloc() call to allocate memory, and then de-allocate it. I'm sure older ones, like COBOL and FORTRAN allowed memory leaks to happen too.

  6. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: Loosing memory

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    The usage I was referring to was when a program allocates RAM, uses it, and doesn't make it available again. The longer the program, or the affected module, is running, the sooner the compute runs out of memory.

    This sort of problem could be referred to as 'memory loss', though it's more commonly* referred to as 'a memory leak'.

    b

    PS For geeks:

    Not very commonly at all nowadays, as most modern programming languages have procedures to stop it happening. Java, for example, has a thing called the Garbage Collector that regularly polls memory looking for bits that haven't been used 'recently' and making them available again. With an older language such as C, the program had to make a malloc() call to allocate memory, and then de-allocate it. I'm sure older ones, like COBOL and FORTRAN allowed memory leaks to happen too.
    Yes, I learned Java before C, and having to take care of allocating my own memory was a pain in C. Fortunately, I did not pursue C very far (or Java, for that matter).

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    #7

    Re: Loosing memory

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Not very commonly at all nowadays, as most modern programming languages have procedures to stop it happening. Java, for example, has a thing called the Garbage Collector that regularly polls memory looking for bits that haven't been used 'recently' and making them available again. With an older language such as C, the program had to make a malloc() call to allocate memory, and then de-allocate it. I'm sure older ones, like COBOL and FORTRAN allowed memory leaks to happen too.
    The main idea of C is that the programmer knows exactly what he wants (so he is responsilble for memory controll). That is the machine is dull while the master (programmer) is clever. That is the reason C is still nowadays one of the most powerful languages, since it gives the programmer tools to write either at high level or low level. Although very beautiful, java is not a low-level language.

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