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    • Join Date: Sep 2009
    • Posts: 2
    #1

    Must & Have

    Hi all,

    Could somebody please explain to me the difference between "Must" and "Have" with certain examples ?

    Thanks
    Niroshana


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #2

    Re: Must & Have

    Quote Originally Posted by niroshana View Post
    Hi all,

    Could somebody please explain to me the difference between "Must" and "Have" with certain examples ?

    Thanks
    Niroshana
    must - often used with rules and regulations - announcements - strong advice - sounds more formal - A speaker might feel more strongly about a particular obligation, and therefore use "must".

    In its negative form, "must" expresses prohibition, whereas "have to" when negated simply means there's no obligation.

    have to and 've got - 's got - used for most ordinary and typical expressions of obligation

    Here are a couple examples:

    Sidney's doctor told him that he must change his diet and quit smoking. Now Sidney's just going to have three Big Mac's a day instead of six. That ought to help.

    I have to get going now. Maybe someone else can think of a few examples? Why don't you try it? There are no structural rules here, just what we subjectively may think sounds natural.

    The only thing bound by grammar with "have to" and "must" is this: In its negative form, "must" expresses prohibition, whereas "have to" when negated simply means there's no obligation.

    We must leave now or we'll miss the show!

    A couple expressions to distinguish "must" and "have to".

    Must you? (serious language - formal) = Do you have to do that?

    It's a must. You have to do this.

    If you must, then go ahead.
    Last edited by PROESL; 10-Sep-2009 at 14:11. Reason: left out a word - typo


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: Must & Have

    There's one thing I forgot:

    In reported speech, there's no way to change "must" to a past form. It's always "must". With "have to", this is obviously different.

    She must stop thinking about this. It's getting her nowhere.

    He said that she must stop thinking about this. It's getting her nowhere.

    You have to sign in at the desk each time you come here.

    She that I had to sign in at the desk each I come here.

    This is also possible: She said that I have to sign in at the desk each time I come here.

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