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  1. Newbie
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    • Join Date: Sep 2009
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    #1

    Question record, perfect, import, permit

    I am trying to answer a question for my course. I am supposed to identify and explain the general problem that learners might have with a group of words in regards to meaning and pronunciation. The words are record, perfect, import, and permit. The only thing I could think of is that all the words have two usages, all are nouns and verbs but I am not sure if that is the only answer. As for the pronunciation, my guess is that you donīt pronounce the last constanent but then you kind of do..... ANY help/information/ would be greatly appreciated!!!! Thank you
    Last edited by beany; 10-Sep-2009 at 15:56. Reason: wait, is perfect a noun??

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: record, perfect, import, permit

    English has a Teutotic tradition that still survives in many non-Anglo-Saxon words: a noun is stressed on the first syllable, a verb on the second.

    Thus /'re kord/ is a noun, /re 'ko:rd/ is a verb.

  3. Newbie
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    #3

    Re: record, perfect, import, permit

    wow thank you, I never would have figured that out. Can you recommend me any references for reading more about that concept??

  4. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: record, perfect, import, permit


  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: record, perfect, import, permit

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    English has a Teutotic tradition that still survives in many non-Anglo-Saxon words: a noun is stressed on the first syllable, a verb on the second.

    Thus /'re kord/ is a noun, /re 'ko:rd/ is a verb.
    I presume beany will be teaching American English, in which case this rule may work in all cases. It's a useful 'rule of thumb' for Br English as well, but has exceptions; for example, 'research' is /rɪ'sɜʧ/ (for many speakers) in both cases. (The attractiveness of the rule means that many Br English speakers* have adopted it, and believe the invariant version is 'wrong'; they're wrong. )

    b

    PS * ... and some online dictionaries, I shouldn't wonder. The path of least resistance (not accounting for irregularities) means they can put less effort into producing their content; so they save money. Caveat emptor (Buyer beware) - especially when the price is that low: free advice is worth every penny.
    Last edited by BobK; 11-Sep-2009 at 18:20. Reason: Added PS; fixed typo

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