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    #1

    Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Hello Everyone,

    "Zhua Jing Shi Jian" in Chinese means do something more quicly so that it can be finished at the soonest, it also , according to my understanding", has the meaning of " don't waste time!"" don't delay!" I would like to know here its corresponding spoken English? In my memory, it is "come on"?

    For example, my kid was playing yesterday evening without finishing his homework, can I say" Come on, go and finish your homework!" By the way, Is there something improper with " go and finish your homework here"

    Regards

    Sky


    • Join Date: May 2008
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    #2

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    "Zhua Jing Shi Jian" in Chinese means do something more quicly so that it can be finished at the soonest, it also , according to my understanding", has the meaning of " don't waste time!"" don't delay!" I would like to know here its corresponding spoken English? In my memory, it is "come on"?

    For example, my kid was playing yesterday evening without finishing his homework, can I say" Come on, go and finish your homework!" By the way, Is there something improper with " go and finish your homework here"

    Regards

    Sky
    Hello, Sky.

    抓緊時間 in Chinese?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #3

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    It's possible to understand "Come on" to mean "Hurry up," especially if it is said in an impatient way, and in context:

    - "Hey hey hey! C'mon! C'mon! Let's get going here!" (while clapping hands or snapping fingers to attract attention perhaps)
    - "Come on, Bronco! Giddyup!" (while spurring the horse)


    The expression might also mean

    Complaints or orders to "cut it out" or "knock it off"
    - "Hey, c'mon you guys. Quit it, will ya?"
    - "Oh, come on -- like I would believe THAT?!"
    - "Come come, my dear. You are exaggerating."

    Calling for people to "come along and follow"
    - "Come on, everyone! The show is starting."
    - "C'mon, you guys! Follow me!"
    - "Come on, kids. Get in the car."


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    #4

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Hello Everyone,

    "By the way, Is there something improper with " go and finish your homework here"
    I generally don't like the locution of "and" in the place of "to"

    For example, "Try and finish your homework" is a commonly heard colloquialism for "Try TO finish your homework."

    The only time I think that "Try and" is acceptable is in the comical phrase
    "Try AND!" meaning, "Good luck with THAT! It will be impossible!"

    "I'm going to telephone the President about my complaint."
    "Try AND!"

    I don't think "Go TO finish your homework" would work, but perhaps "Go finish your homework" would be better than "Go and finish."


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    #5

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Hurry up and get your homework done.

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    #6

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello, Sky.

    抓緊時間 in Chinese?
    Yes, you are great? I admire you that you are using traditional Chinese! Yes, it is 抓紧时间!! Traditional Chinese is much much more meaningful than the simplicified ones!

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    #7

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I generally don't like the locution of "and" in the place of "to"

    For example, "Try and finish your homework" is a commonly heard colloquialism for "Try TO finish your homework."

    The only time I think that "Try and" is acceptable is in the comical phrase
    "Try AND!" meaning, "Good luck with THAT! It will be impossible!"

    "I'm going to telephone the President about my complaint."
    "Try AND!"

    I don't think "Go TO finish your homework" would work, but perhaps "Go finish your homework" would be better than "Go and finish."
    Many thanks for your time!!

    I would like to know here if Daruma's answer is common in spoken English? I myself feel it ok?


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    #8

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    Many thanks for your time!!

    I would like to know here if Daruma's answer is common in spoken English? I myself feel it ok?
    Yes, I think it is quite common and perfectly acceptable to say "Hurry up and ...."
    - "C'mon, Charlie! Hurry up and finish your homework so we can watch TV!"

    I think "Hurry up with . . . " may be just as common:
    - "Hurry up with those scissors. It's my turn to use them."
    - "If I hurry up with my homework, can we go get ice cream?"

    Soldiers describe the military experience as "Hurry up and wait."
    This means that they are chivvied by the NCOs into sprinting to the next location, where everything stalls out, so they then spend a long time doing a whole lot of nothing -- after that mad dash to get there.

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    #9

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I generally don't like the locution of "and" in the place of "to"

    For example, "Try and finish your homework" is a commonly heard colloquialism for "Try TO finish your homework."

    The only time I think that "Try and" is acceptable is in the comical phrase
    "Try AND!" meaning, "Good luck with THAT! It will be impossible!"

    "I'm going to telephone the President about my complaint."
    "Try AND!"

    I don't think "Go TO finish your homework" would work, but perhaps "Go finish your homework" would be better than "Go and finish."
    But I am confused by your saying I don't think "Go TO finish your homework" would work, but perhaps "Go finish your homework" would be better than "Go and finish."?


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    #10

    Re: Zhua Jing Shi Jian?

    Quote Originally Posted by sky753 View Post
    But I am confused by your saying I don't think "Go TO finish your homework" would work, but perhaps "Go finish your homework" would be better than "Go and finish."?
    I just tend to shy away from "and" between two verbs.

    Sometimes "and" between two verbs is an error for "to" in front of the second verb:
    - Example: Try and get the lawn furniture covered before it rains.
    - Correct: Try to get the lawn furniture covered before it rains.

    Other times, "and" between two verbs merely indicates a predicate with two actions:
    - Correct: She likes to sing and dance.

    So because of this generalized aversion of mine to usages like "try and," I have an impulse to avoid it in "go and" as well.

    Now "go and finish" is a normal English expression (whether I like it or not), and "go finish" is also a normal English expression (which I prefer).

    But "go to finish" is not used -- even if changing "and" to "to" is the ordinary "fix" I would use for "try and" (for example).

    > "Come and hold the door open for me" I would alter to "Come hold the door open for me."

    > "Look and see if he has arrived yet" I would alter to "See if he has arrived yet."

    > "Wait and see" I would not alter, since it's just a predicate with two distinct actions.

    > "Try and eat your dinner" I would alter to "Try to eat your dinner."

    > "Go and get the mail" I would alter to "Go get the mail."

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