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    #1

    for

    The inspector will prepare a report FOR the minister.
    My understanding is "The inspector will prepare a report and hand it in to the minister", is it correct ?
    Thanks.


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    #2

    Re: for

    Hello, yuhan

    I'm afraid you're mistaken.

    When we arrived home, mother had already prepared dinner for us.
    當我們到家時,母親已為我們準備好了晚餐。

    This sentence does not imply that "we" had the dinner that the mother had cooked.

    I hope this helps.

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    #3

    Re: for

    A few alternatives:
    you present a report
    to submit a report to someone
    you write a report on something
    you draw up a report

    To prepare a report (for someone/ for a meeting), sounds OK to me.


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    #4

    Re: for

    Hello, Daruma San
    The two 'for's in these two sentenses don't mean exactly the same thing.
    My understanding is ok but there's a problem with my wording.
    '為' and '給' are not exactly the same thing.(I have the answer now.)
    視察員要準備一份報告部長。
    ARIGATOUGOZAYIMASU


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    #5

    Re: for

    Quote Originally Posted by yuhan View Post
    The inspector will prepare a report FOR the minister.
    My understanding is "The inspector will prepare a report and hand it in to the minister", is it correct ?
    Thanks.
    Yes, this is correct. The meaning can be further explained by saying that the minister will possess and use the report. The purpose the inspector has in preparing the report is to give it to the minister so that the minister can possess it, use it, consume it, or benefit from it in some way.

    This explanation is somewhat roundabout, but the idea is to explain "for" in this sentence without using the word "for".
    Last edited by PROESL; 12-Sep-2009 at 01:57.

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    #6

    Re: for

    The person could be preparing the report on the minister's behalf (doing the work for him) or to submit it to the minister. Given that it is an inspector, the latter is more likely IMO, but I take that from the noun not the preposition.


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    #7

    Re: for

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    The person could be preparing the report on the minister's behalf (doing the work for him) or to submit it to the minister. Given that it is an inspector, the latter is more likely IMO, but I take that from the noun not the preposition.
    IMO is "in my opinion," isn't it?


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    #8

    Re: for

    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    The person could be preparing the report on the minister's behalf (doing the work for him) or to submit it to the minister. Given that it is an inspector, the latter is more likely IMO, but I take that from the noun not the preposition.
    Yes, I considered that it could be on the minister's behalf. (as in speak for him - he can speak for himself)

    Explaining prepositions by attributing meaning to them is possible, but rather difficult sometimes, as well. I've thought this was more often than not something that is possible. And after reading English Prepositions Explained by Seth Lindstromberg, I've become more convinced that more often than not it is possible to explain prepositions. Of course, it would seem at times that it's not possible, which is something the author recognizes in his book.


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    #9

    Re: for

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    IMO is "in my opinion," isn't it?
    Yes, it is. IMO is an Internet abbreviation, similar to FYI - for your information - and ASAP - as soon as possible. Though I think ASAP came into use before the rise in popularity of email, chatting, and other communication associated with the Internet.
    Last edited by PROESL; 12-Sep-2009 at 02:18.


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    #10

    Re: for

    I agree with you. I also take this from the noun (their relationship) rather than the prepsition.

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