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    #1

    please help

    when i want to say" they are unemployed" ,which is correct?

    They are out of a job.
    They are out out of jobs.


    I know that"out of a job" is a idiom.


    • Join Date: Oct 2006
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    #2

    Re: please help

    Both are correct [with the deletion of one "out" in the second option], depending on your fuller context. You could also say "They have no job/jobs".

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    #3

    Re: please help

    Can it be applied in other situations?

    for example, a,b and c also have a apple.

    then,
    "they have apples"
    "they both have a apple"
    Are two sentences the same?


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    #4

    Re: please help

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    Can it be applied in other situations?

    for example, a,b and c each have an apple.

    then,
    "they have apples"
    "they all/each have an apple"
    Are two sentences the same?
    Not quite the same - one is a general statement; the other is a specific statement.

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    #5

    Re: please help

    May you explain it more?
    I am not understand clearly.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #6

    Re: please help

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    when i want to say" they are unemployed" ,which is correct?

    They are out of a job.
    They are out out of jobs.


    I know that"out of a job" is a idiom.
    Assuming they're all from the same company in the same situation, I would say "They're out of a job".

    If it's one person, then, of coures, it's "He's out of a job" or "She's out of a job".

    Personally, I would not use the plural "they're out of jobs".


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #7

    Re: please help

    "They're out of work" would do the trick, I think.

    If you wanted to stress that a company shut down and laid off all its violin makers, then it is more than being "out of work." Instead they ARE out of a job -- and I think you can say "THEY are out of A job" if they all had the same work. At least, everyone would understand you, and no one would react to this locution.

    If they were each laid off from different jobs, perhaps you could say
    "They're all out of their jobs."


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    #8

    Re: please help

    Quote Originally Posted by kelvin123 View Post
    Can it be applied in other situations?

    for example, a,b and c also have a apple.

    then,
    "they have apples"
    "they both have a apple"
    Are two sentences the same?

    > "They have apples."
    This means that the three people are in possession of a number of apples -- say a bagful of apples.
    - "Let's get a, b, and c to help us make dessert. They have apples, so we can make a pie."


    > "They both have a apple."
    1) Three people (a, b, and c) are not "both." "Both" means exactly two.
    2) The article is "an" not "a" because the word "apple" begins with a vowel.
    This sentence means that two people have exactly one apple each (even if it shouldn't really mean that by some ways of interpreting this sentence.) This phrase is the one that is universally used in spoken English to say that two people have one apple apiece.
    - "John and Sylvia both have an apple, but Franklin has a pear."

    > "They EACH have an apple."
    This means the same -- that each person has his own apple -- one apple per person.
    - "They each have an apple, so they will each have some fruit for dessert after they eat their sandwiches."

    The idea that they have exactly one apple between the two of them is harder to express; such a situation does not arise often enough to have its own terminology. Even when two people share something routinely (for example, a married couple who share their house and their car), it is still rare to have to say that "they have only one car and only one house to share between the two of them."

    If you did want to stress that, you can say:
    "Well, they own only one car."
    "They share a single car between them."
    "They have only one apple for the two of them."
    "All three have only one apple to divide among themselves."
    "The three of them found a single apple."
    "There's only one apple for the three of them."
    Last edited by Ann1977; 13-Sep-2009 at 07:20.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #9

    Re: please help

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    "They're out of work" would do the trick, I think.
    Yes, "they're out of work" works well.

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