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    • Join Date: May 2008
    • Posts: 1,157
    #1

    I donít go in for golf much.

    Hello.

    Definition of go, Macmillan Online Dictionary: Free American English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    go in for something
    to enjoy a particular thing or activity
    I donít go in for golf much.


    Can I say "a lot" instead of much?

    Thank you.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: I donít go in for golf much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    Definition of go, Macmillan Online Dictionary: Free American English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    go in for something
    to enjoy a particular thing or activity
    I don’t go in for golf much.


    Can I say "a lot" instead of much?

    Thank you.
    No, I don't think you can use "a lot" in this case.

    "I don't go in for golf much" means "not much at all," and you might even say "I don't go in for golf much; I generally don't like sports much at all."

    So it ends up meaning that you don't like golf at all.
    That means that it doesn't make sense to say you don't like it at all a lot.

    You could possibly hear:
    "Do you go in for golf much?"
    "Well, I like it somewhat -- but I don't go in for it a lot." (or "not a whole lot")

    "Not a lot" describes the degree to which you like something, so if you don't like it at all, there is no sense in describing exactly how MUCH you don't like it at all.

    You can say:
    "I go in for golf a lot."
    "I go in for golf, but not a lot."

    But I don't think you can say
    "I don't go in for golf a lot."

    Possibly you could say
    "I don't really go in for golf a WHOLE lot" -- meaning "only a little, not a lot"

    (Unless you are specifically negating or denying the proposition that you DO like it a lot, maybe.)
    "Say! I hear that you go in for golf a lot!"
    "No, not true. I don't go in for golf 'a lot.' I like it only a little."
    Last edited by Ann1977; 12-Sep-2009 at 10:22.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #3

    Re: I donít go in for golf much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    Definition of go, Macmillan Online Dictionary: Free American English Dictionary and Thesaurus
    go in for something
    to enjoy a particular thing or activity
    I don’t go in for golf much.

    Can I say "a lot" instead of much?

    Thank you.
    It would be grammatically correct, but this particular phrase sounds more natural with "much". We often "much" in negations, or we modify it with an adverb: very much, so much, too, much, way too much.

    Using "much" in affirmative sentences creates a more formal or serious tone. However, this doesn't mean the entire tone of one's spoken discourse in a given situation or conversation is necessarily formal or "extra serious". One should be careful with this because we do usually use "much" in negations or we modify it. It's possible to produce sentences that don't sound natural if one uses "much" in an affirmative sentence or does not modiify it.

    They had much fun. - This doesn't exactly like a natural sentence to me.

    They had a lot of fun. - This is much better.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #4

    Re: I donít go in for golf much.

    Hi, PROESL ~

    I see that you're a fellow Bostonian. This cold rain's wrecking any plans for outdoor activities -- no doubt that's why we're both happy to stay indoors playing on the computer.

    I thought about this expression -

    "I don't go in for golf much."
    "Oh really? Not too much? Well, *I* don't go in for golf -- a LOT!"

    (as a joking way to say "I don't go in for golf at ALL; in a BIG way I don't go in for it -- I HATE golf!")


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #5

    Re: I donít go in for golf much.

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Hi, PROESL ~

    I see that you're a fellow Bostonian. This cold rain's wrecking any plans for outdoor activities -- no doubt that's why we're both happy to stay indoors playing on the computer.

    I thought about this expression -

    "I don't go in for golf much."
    "Oh really? Not too much? Well, *I* don't go in for golf -- a LOT!"

    (as a joking way to say "I don't go in for golf at ALL; in a BIG way I don't go in for it -- I HATE golf!")
    Yes, I agree that's possible. Many times with language it's simply a question of what is likely or not likely in certain circumstances. People make language choices according to their viewpoint.

    Yes, outdoor activities are canceled today.


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