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    #1

    muddle/muddle through/muddle along/just about enough/captive(n),(a)/ransom

    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?

    1. We left them to muddle through on their own.

    2. The British usually muddle through somehow.

    muddle through = to progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances; to achieve a degree of success without much planning or effort

    3. I don't know how he produces any results, the way he muddles along.
    muddle about = through cope; manage somehow

    4. Don't muddle me about like that, tell me exactly what you want.
    muddle = to make turbid or muddy; jumble

    5. Just as you found it difficult to like Mr. Green, so I found it easy to like his wife.
    just as.. so = in the same way as

    6. I have had just about enough of your impudence.
    just about enough = (used to indicate approximation) more or less - almost more than I can endure

    7. Put it just over there!
    just over there = near that place

    8. I am just an ordinary man.
    just = only merely

    9. They were taken captive.
    captive (n) = one, such as a prisoner of war, who is forcibly confined, subjugated, or enslaved

    10. A poor, miserable, captive thrall.
    captive (a) = taken and held prisoner, as in war

    11. His wife ransomed him at a heavy price.
    ransomed = redeemed

    12. She have to pay a ransom for him.
    ransom = money demanded for the return of a captured person; payment for the release of someone

    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    Last edited by vil; 13-Sep-2009 at 08:00.

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      • Native Language:
      • Oriya
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    #2

    Re: muddle/muddle through/muddle along/just about enough/captive(n),(a)/ransom

    Quote Originally Posted by vil View Post
    Dear teachers,

    Would you be kind enough to tell me whether I am right with my interpretation of the expressions in bold in the following sentences?
    1. We left them to muddle through on their own. OK

    2. The British usually muddle through somehow.
    OK

    muddle through = to progress or perform adequately, especially in difficult circumstances; to achieve a degree of success without much planning or effort

    3. I don't know how he
    can produce any results, the way he muddles along.
    muddle about = through
    cope; manage somehow (not really) =to continue doing something with no clear purpose or plan
    I don't think he knows where his career is going - he just muddles along from day to day.

    4. Don't muddle me about like that, tell me exactly what you want.
    muddle = to make turbid or muddy; jumble
    OK

    5. Just as you found it difficult to like Mr. Green, so I found it easy to like his wife.
    just as.. so = in the same way as
    OK

    6. I have had just about enough of your impudence.
    OK
    just about enough = (used to indicate approximation) more or less - almost more than I can endure

    7. Put it just over there!
    OK
    just over there = near that place

    8. I am just an ordinary man.
    OK
    just = only merely
    =simply

    9. They were taken captive.
    OK
    captive (n) = one, such as a prisoner of war, who is forcibly confined, subjugated, or enslaved

    10. A poor, miserable, captive thrall. T
    hrall= slave, captive or bondman
    captive (a) = taken and held prisoner, as in war(Does not match with the above expression)

    11. His wife ransomed him at
    /for a heavy price. I think for is more appropriate.
    ransomed = redeemed

    12. She have to pay a ransom for him.
    OK
    ransom = money demanded for the return of a captured person; payment for the release of someone


    Thank you for your efforts.

    Regards,

    V.
    SKP

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