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  1. Pamian98
    Guest
    #1

    Red face should instead of would

    I find it very annoying that people are using should instead of would eg
    I should be very grateful for your input in this matter.
    I would be very grateful for your input in this matter.
    Which one is correct?
    Thanks for your time.
    Pamian98


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #2

    Re: should instead of would

    Quote Originally Posted by Pamian98 View Post
    I find it very annoying that people are using should instead of would eg
    I should be very grateful for your input in this matter.
    I would be very grateful for your input in this matter.
    Which one is correct?
    Thanks for your time.
    Pamian98
    Both are correct. Using "should" in this way - where we expect "would" - adds a more formal tone to the statement. This use of "should" is not very frequent, but people do use "should" this way from time to time.

  2. konungursvia's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Canada
      • Current Location:
      • Canada

    • Join Date: Mar 2009
    • Posts: 5,158
    #3

    Re: should instead of would

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Both are correct. Using "should" in this way - where we expect "would" - adds a more formal tone to the statement. This use of "should" is not very frequent, but people do use "should" this way from time to time.
    I find it British-formal, rather than simply "formal," i.e. I'm not sure it's very common in AmE except in people emulating BrE. for some reason.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 2,036
    #4

    Re: should instead of would

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    I find it British-formal, rather than simply "formal," i.e. I'm not sure it's very common in AmE except in people emulating BrE. for some reason.
    This use of "should", along with things like "need not", I find to be useful in expressing politeness, yet at the same time show a degree of dissatisfaction or distaste. The formal tone of such expressions as these is useful for this, I find.



    I would say it's more common in BrE, yes, but, as a matter of opinion, I wouldn't say that Americans are necessarily emulating British style by using it. Or at least they're not making a conscious effort to do so, though it may turn out that way.

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