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    #1

    not a teacher

    my granddaughter is working on vowels and they want her to lable each word by vccv how to you tell in the word distance

  1. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by tkcolton View Post
    my granddaughter is working on vowels and they want her to lable each word by vccv how to you tell in the word distance
    It might help to recall that vowel, from the French voyelle, is cognate with the word 'vocal' as in vocal cords. A vowel is produced with the vocal cords, shaped into a particular quality or sound with the mouth. The consonants are generally made by the mouth, whether or not they are accompanied by a vocal vibration (/m/, /b/) or not (/t/, /p/). Also, the vowel sounds are represented by the letters a e i o u and y, or combinations of these. All the other letters represent consonants, to simplify a bit. This should make it easier for her. [Never mind that I personally believe the English R sound to be a vowel some of the time, a semi-vowel at other times. No one else seems to think so along with me.]

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    [Never mind that I personally believe the English R sound to be a vowel some of the time, a semi-vowel at other times. No one else seems to think so along with me.]
    OK, I'll bite.
    Can you give an example of some words in which 'r' functions as a vowel, along with the reason you would call it a vowel in that setting?

  3. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: not a teacher

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    OK, I'll bite.
    Can you give an example of some words in which 'r' functions as a vowel, along with the reason you would call it a vowel in that setting?
    Yee-ha! Okay, I'm talking about rhotic AmE regions in particular:

    her - we go straight from /h/ into a prolonged American R sound shaped by the tongue yet emanating from the vocal cords
    burn - same
    fur - same

    It seems to fit perfectly the definition and use of a vowel. Furthermore, in all international English R sounds, it functions as a semi-vowel just like /j/ and /w/. Doesn't it?

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