Results 1 to 9 of 9
  1. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #1

    Arrow The act of going outside in the rain

    Hi,

    How would a native speaker describe the act of going for some work when it is raining and getting drenched in the process?

    I had to go out for some work and it was a heavy downpour. I went outside in the rain and got wringing wet. My hair got ruffeled and wet and shoes got studded with mud.

    Is my above construction correct?

    Thanks a ton


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #2

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    How would a native speaker describe the act of going for some work when it is raining and getting drenched in the process?

    I had to go out for some work and it was a heavy downpour. I went outside in the rain and got wringing wet. My hair got ruffeled and wet and shoes got studded with mud.

    Is my above construction correct?

    Thanks a ton
    1) I think it would be smoother to say
    "I had to work outside during a heavy downpour."

    2)I think I would let the word "downpour" do its work, and delete "heavy" as redundant. There are no other kinds of downpours but heavy ones.

    3) I would not repeat the going outside phrases, so I would delete the second one

    4) The standard expression is "soaking wet" and (less often) "sopping wet." The expression "I got drenched" is often used.
    > The phrase "wringing wet" is usually reserved for clothing or fabrics, rather then people (even if the people have clothes on.). That is because we squeeze water out of clothing by "wringing" it
    > On the other hand, it is better to AVOID "standard expressions" just because their commonness has drained them of freshness and interest.

    5) Your hair might get ruffled by wind, but it could not be ruffled if it were soaking wet -- it would be too heavy with water to get "ruffled," even if it were also windy as well as rainy.
    > Your hair might get plastered to your head, or strands of it might get plastered to your face.

    6) Saying your hair got "wet" in this downpour is kind of tame. It is a weak word that dulls the sentence by reining in its imagery.

    7) You have to repeat "my" before "shoes."
    > I'm not sure why. Possibly it is because "shoes" are too different from "hair." I think you could say, "My face and head got wet" or "my shirt and shoes got wet."
    > But when it is "my hair and garden plants" or "my shirt and face," then you need to repeat the word "my." Probably it is orienting the reader to a shift in the topic.

    8) I have never heard "studded with mud." It is interesting to read because it is a new expression.
    > But at the same time it is distracting, because the reader's attention is diverted into trying to formulate a picture of "studded with mud."

    I had to work outside in a wild downpour. I got drenched. My clothes got wringing wet,
    the rain plastered my hair to my face, and my shoes turned into heavy balls of mud.
    The wind nearly tipped me over.

    Last edited by Ann1977; 15-Sep-2009 at 01:32.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #3

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    1) I think it would be smoother to say
    "I had to work outside during a heavy downpour."

    2)I think I would let the word "downpour" do its work, and delete "heavy" as redundant. There are no other kinds of downpours but heavy ones.

    3) I would not repeat the going outside phrases, so I would delete the second one

    4) The standard expression is "soaking wet" and (less often) "sopping wet." The expression "I got drenched" is often used.
    > The phrase "wringing wet" is usually reserved for clothing or fabrics, rather then people (even if the people have clothes on.). That is because we squeeze water out of clothing by "wringing" it
    > On the other hand, it is better to AVOID "standard expressions" just because their commonness has drained them of freshness and interest.

    5) Your hair might get ruffled by wind, but it could not be ruffled if it were soaking wet -- it would be too heavy with water to get "ruffled," even if it were also windy as well as rainy.
    > Your hair might get plastered to your head, or strands of it might get plastered to your face.

    6) Saying your hair got "wet" in this downpour is kind of tame. It is a weak word that dulls the sentence by reining in its imagery.

    7) You have to repeat "my" before "shoes."
    > I'm not sure why. Possibly it is because "shoes" are too different from "hair." I think you could say, "My face and head got wet" or "my shirt and shoes got wet."
    > But when it is "my hair and garden plants" or "my shirt and face," then you need to repeat the word "my." Probably it is orienting the reader to a shift in the topic.

    8) I have never heard "studded with mud." It is interesting to read because it is a new expression.
    > But at the same time it is distracting, because the reader's attention is diverted into trying to formulate a picture of "studded with mud."

    I had to work outside in a wild downpour. I got drenched. My clothes got wringing wet,
    the rain plastered my hair to my face, and my shoes turned into heavy balls of mud.
    The wind nearly tipped me over.
    Thanks a bundle, the moment I saw you online here, I knew I am going to get an elaborate and enriching reply.
    Can you please explain the expression "caked my shoes" and in which other contexts can it be used?

  3. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #4

    Talking Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Thanks a bundle, the moment I saw you online here, I knew I am going to get an elaborate and enriching reply.
    Can you please explain the expression "caked my shoes" and in which other contexts can it be used?
    Oh you edited your text and changed "caked my shoes" to "turned them into balls of mud"...LOL


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #5

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    "caked" means "encrusted" -- especially with heavy or wet or sticky things, not so much dry and powdery things

    > The woman's face was caked with makeup.

    > After he had eaten, the toddler's high chair was caked with porridge.

    > The walls of the crime scene were caked with dried blood.

    > The artist's technique involved caking the canvas with paint applied with a palette knife instead of a brush.

    > To escape insect bites, the campers caked their faces with mud from the riverbank.

    But
    > The floors of the abandoned house were thick with dust
    - (you might see "caked with dust," but I would not prefer it)

    > Her hair was piled in elaborate layers on the top of her head
    - (not "caked" here -- not gluey and encrusted enough)

    > Moss obliterated the name on the old tombstone.
    - (not "caked" here -- not "thickly applied" in the same sense)


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #6

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Oh you edited your text and changed "caked my shoes" to "turned them into balls of mud"...LOL
    LOL!

    Yes I did.

    On second thought, I decided that a mere "caking" of mud was not enough.

    And I wanted to give a fresher description - something to arrest the attention rather than just
    move the eye along mindlessly.

  4. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #7

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    LOL!

    Yes I did.

    On second thought, I decided that a mere "caking" of mud was not enough.

    And I wanted to give a fresher description - something to arrest the attention rather than just
    move the eye along mindlessly.
    Thats a nice expression, "arrest the attention", I ve heard "catch the attention"


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
    • Posts: 1,131
    #8

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Thats a nice expression, "arrest the attention", I ve heard "catch the attention"
    I also wish I had not written "heavy" balls of mud. What other kinds of balls of mud can there be?

    Sentences shouldn't be caked with redundancies and trivializing words. They slow sentences down like an anchor impeding the progress of a sailboat.

  5. anupumh's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Native Language:
      • Hindi
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India

    • Join Date: Jul 2009
    • Posts: 1,110
    #9

    Re: The act of going outside in the rain

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    I also wish I had not written "heavy" balls of mud. What other kinds of balls of mud can there be?

    Sentences shouldn't be caked with redundancies and trivializing words. They slow sentences down like an anchor impeding the progress of a sailboat.
    I am not aware what other kinds of Balls of Mud there can be.........
    Thats wonderfu,l now you are using similies and wonderful analogies to decorate your sentences and make them more picturous and impactful...

Similar Threads

  1. heavy rain /a heavy rain
    By henz988 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Jul-2009, 07:12
  2. rain
    By henz988 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 10-Jul-2009, 16:13
  3. a hard rain
    By joham in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 03-May-2008, 14:42
  4. will be rain
    By dido4 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 27-Oct-2006, 20:01

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •