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    • Join Date: Feb 2009
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    #1

    Exclamation softer vs more soft

    Hello there.

    Which sentence is correct?

    My wife likes noodles softer than I prefer.
    My wife likes noodles more soft than I prefer.


    Please help me.

  1. Offroad's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: softer vs more soft

    I like 'softer'.

    'more softer' is a bit odd to me. Others may disagree.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: softer vs more soft

    Quote Originally Posted by gchman View Post
    Hello there.

    Which sentence is correct?

    My wife likes noodles softer than I prefer.
    My wife likes noodles more soft than I prefer.


    Please help me.
    My wife likes noodles which are softer than the ones which I prefer.

    This sounds better to me.

    In english we have 3 degrees of comparison: positive (soft), comparative (softer), superlative (softest). Softer will be used when you are comparing two things.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #4

    Re: softer vs more soft

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    My wife likes noodles which are softer than the ones which I prefer.

    This sounds better to me.

    In english we have 3 degrees of comparison: positive (soft), comparative (softer), superlative (softest). Softer will be used when you are comparing two things.
    That's right.

    The original question did not include "more softer," which is always wrong.

    The asker just wanted to know if we say "more soft" or "softer."

    We do say "more distinguished" and not "distinguisheder."
    We say "more curious" and not "curiouser and curiouser"

    > "Curiouser and curiouser," cried Alice (she was so much surprised, that
    for the moment she quite forgot how to speak good English) . . "
    ~ Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland)

    We do sometimes omit the "er" ending and replace it with "more" in front of the adjective,
    but only when the word is long or the "er" ending is hard to say.

    In this case, "soft" is a short word, and "softer" is easy to say, so that's the form we use.


    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #5

    Re: softer vs more soft

    Quote Originally Posted by gchman View Post
    Hello there.

    Which sentence is correct?

    My wife likes noodles softer than I prefer.
    My wife likes noodles more soft than I prefer.


    Please help me.
    The first sentence is correct. However, I think it would be more usual and typical to stick to the same verb. Therefore, I suggest this, "My wife likes noodles softer than I do". With "do" we understand that the verb is the same - "do" is used in place of "like". This, to me, is more typical of native speaker usage. However, it's still correct to use "prefer" in the second clause.

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