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    • Join Date: Sep 2009
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    #1

    sentence meaning

    Which one is correct?



    1. Why do you not get the up of tea for me?

    2. Why don't you get the cup of tea for me?

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    #2

    Re: sentence meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by nupur View Post
    Which one is correct?



    1. Why do you not get the cup of tea for me?

    2. Why don't you get the cup of tea for me?
    They're both correct, but in all cases, you could say 2, which is much more common.


    • Join Date: Sep 2009
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    #3

    Re: sentence meaning

    can we use much and more together in a sentence? Provide examples please.


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #4

    Re: sentence meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by nupur View Post
    can we use much and more together in a sentence? Provide examples please.

    "I can't take much more of this noise and confusion."

    "He gave her much more money than he gave her brother."

    "There is much more to come, so stay tuned."

    "I won't put up with very much more aggravation from you!"

    "I didn't see much more benefit in buying that brand instead of the cheaper one."

    I think in general that you can modify "more"
    > much more
    > very much more

    You can also use "much less"

    "I eat much less at lunch than I do at dinner."

    "I like John much less than I like Winslow."

    "I am very much less inclined to vacation at the lake this year than I was last year."


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #5

    Re: sentence meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by nupur View Post
    Which one is correct?



    1. Why do you not get the up of tea for me?

    2. Why don't you get the cup of tea for me?
    I think the first one is a challenge to explain one's willful omission:
    "What is it that is causing you to refuse me this service?"

    The second one COULD be such a challenge, but it is also a commonly-used expression for a suggestion --
    "Why not do this or that?"

    "Why not go to the movies tonight!" is a rhetorical question at best. It is really a suggestion
    -- "Let's go to the movies."

    But "Why do you not go to the movies with me?" is asking for an accounting of the refusal
    to attend movies -- at least with me anyway.

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