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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    • Join Date: Jul 2009
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    #1

    Red face Please Check this sentence

    Hi,

    Is it correct to say....?

    She is knee deep in dogs.

    (she is fond of dogs and spends a lot of time taking care of them)

    Thanks


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by anupumh View Post
    Hi,

    Is it correct to say....?

    She is knee deep in dogs.

    (she is fond of dogs and spends a lot of time taking care of them)

    Thanks
    Yes, it's fine. I would play around with "knee-deep" to see if I liked the look of that, and maybe I would even have a look at "kneedeep" before rejecting it.

    I think in the end I would hyphenate it.

    "She's up to her neck in dogs" is an equivalent statement, and to be funny or a little disparaging we might say "She's up to her a** in dogs."


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    #3

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Yes, it's fine. I would play around with "knee-deep" to see if I liked the look of that, and maybe I would even have a look at "kneedeep" before rejecting it.

    I think in the end I would hyphenate it.

    "She's up to her neck in dogs" is an equivalent statement, and to be funny or a little disparaging we might say "She's up to her a** in dogs."
    As I understand it, it takes some time before hyphenated compounds finally become one word, but it eventually happens, I think.

    I see no reason why we should not consider "cellphone" a compound noun. It's all in the pronunciation, which is hard to describe by typing it out. It's one of those sublte but noticeable things.

    I think the same way about "bluejeans". It's really a compound. There are black jeans, but there is no such thing as "blackjeans". By contrast, there is a "greenhouse" and a "green house".

    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Sep-2009 at 04:12.


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    #4

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    As I understand it, it takes a some time before hyphenated compounds finally become one word, but it eventually happens, I think.

    I see no reason why we should not consider "cellphone" a compound noun. It's all in the pronunciation, which is hard to describe by typing it out. It's one of those sublte but noticeable things.

    I think the same way about "bluejeans". It's really a compound. There are black jeans, but there is no such thing as "blackjeans". By contrast, there is a "greenhouse" and a "green house".

    LOL!

    I dunno, PROESL, I dunno.

    I think "blue jeans" and "cell phone" are just going to have to stay as collocations, like "high school" and "paint brush."

    I don't think "bluejeans" is in the "doghouse" category yet!



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    #5

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    LOL!

    I dunno, PROESL, I dunno.

    I think "blue jeans" and "cell phone" are just going to have to stay as collocations, like "high school" and "paint brush."

    I don't think "bluejeans" is in the "doghouse" category yet!

    It is in that category. It's just that the dictionary writers haven't moved on it yet.

    Once again, listen to how they sound: green house - a house that is green - greenhouse - a place to keep plants and flowers

    And now for this pair: black jeans - jeans that are black - bluejeans - a specific type of jeans that are blue, or pants, made from a material we call "denim". They have a certain look and a certain feel that is not matched by what we may call black jeans or grey jeans - jeans that are grey and jeans that are black. Specificity and uniqueness contribute to the compounding of word pairs, and we first notice this by the way we pronounce such word pairs.

    The same thing works with White House and white house. We haven't made the president's house a compound word, I would say, because of a certain respect or deference to the importance of the place. However, it certainly sounds like a compound.

    A White House spokesman ... Someone finally lives in the White House.
    A white house ... They live in a white house.

    Once again, the same thing goes with cell phone. The pronunciation and subtle change in how two words are spoken together make a pair of words a compound, not the day the dictionary writers declare it a compound.


    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Sep-2009 at 03:24.


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    #6

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Oh, I quite agree with you on every point -- except for what you say about the way we should spell those words.

    "Bluejeans" makes me as twitchy as "Whitehouse" would!



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    #7

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Oh, I quite agree with you on every point -- except for what you say about the way we should spell those words.

    "Bluejeans" makes me as twitchy as "Whitehouse" would!

    Really! Wow!

    I can handle it: bluejeans; cellphone; busstop. Why not?



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    #8

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Oh, I quite agree with you on every point -- except for what you say about the way we should spell those words.

    "Bluejeans" makes me as twitchy as "Whitehouse" would!

    What about "cellphone", "homepage" and "website"? Are you okay with those? Any twitching with those words?



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    #9

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    Really! Wow!

    I can handle it: bluejeans; cellphone; busstop. Why not?


    Not BUSSTOP!!!

    NO! Never!



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    #10

    Re: Please Check this sentence

    Quote Originally Posted by Ann1977 View Post
    Not BUSSTOP!!!

    NO! Never!

    But the dictionary writers have already made it so long ago with "roommate".

    She walked to the busstop with her roommate, wearing her new bluejeans and speaking on her cellpone.

    How's that?


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