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    #1

    sit on cash

    Hello.

    sit on (something)
    to delay dealing with or talking about (something)
    ▪ Let's sit on the problem for a while and see if anything changes.
    ▪ They have been sitting on my insurance claim for months!
    ▪ Let's just sit on this news for the time being.


    Is this phrasal verb used in the following sentence?

    how-the-rich-save-today.html: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Thank you.

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    #2

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    sit on (something)
    to delay dealing with or talking about or acting on (something)

    ▪ Let's sit on the problem for a while and see if anything changes.
    ▪ They have been sitting on my insurance claim for months!
    ▪ Let's just sit on this news for the time being.

    Is this phrasal verb used in the following sentence? Yes, the wealthy are not spending or aggressively investing their cash; they are just keeping it in the bank or in a money fund.

    how-the-rich-save-today.html: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Thank you.
    2006


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    #3

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    sit on (something)
    to delay dealing with or talking about (something)
    ▪ Let's sit on the problem for a while and see if anything changes.
    ▪ They have been sitting on my insurance claim for months!
    ▪ Let's just sit on this news for the time being.


    Is this phrasal verb used in the following sentence?

    how-the-rich-save-today.html: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Thank you.
    Yes, that "sit on their cash" matches the idea of "wait and see, delay."

    But more specifically, maybe it means "to prevent the use of, to refuse to use, or to avoid using."

    It is in this sense that we say "He sat on his hands" -- meaning he did not take action ("use his hands") when the opportunity was there.

    "The Mayor sat on his hands while the police department became more and more corrupt."

    I think you might sit on your money in the same way you sit on your hands (more so than in the way you sit on an idea.)

    I never heard this expression, but you might be able to say,
    "The soldier sat on his rifle while the enemy sneaked past his lookout post."


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    #4

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Hello.

    sit on (something)
    to delay dealing with or talking about (something)
    ▪ Let's sit on the problem for a while and see if anything changes.
    ▪ They have been sitting on my insurance claim for months!
    ▪ Let's just sit on this news for the time being.

    Is this phrasal verb used in the following sentence?

    how-the-rich-save-today.html: Personal Finance News from Yahoo! Finance
    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Thank you.
    Yes, this expression is used in that sentence. However, I don't think I'd call it a phrasal verb. I would call it an idiom, that being to sit on something. We normally understand "sit on" in a physical or concrete way. However, the expression sit on something represents an idea (an abstraction), which is inaction - not taking action in a particular way - doing nothing. The preposition "on" does not change the meaning of "sit" (therefore, it's not a phrasal verb). It's the combination of the two words that makes the expression an example of reification, in my opinion. This is something that occurs in English from time to time. Anyway, before I call it a phrasal verb, I would say sit on something, as it's used here, is a kind of idiom.

    I would just end by saying not all verb-preposition combinations are phrasal verbs, which I think you knew anyway, but I just wanted to clarify.

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    #5

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by PROESL View Post
    I would just end by saying not all verb-preposition combinations are phrasal verbs, which I think you knew anyway, but I just wanted to clarify.
    But many are, but even more interesting is the fact that many phrasal verbs serve double duty as idioms too. (see through, cough up, lean on)

    "sit on" is listed as a phrasal verb on this site.


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    #6

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    But many are, but even more interesting is the fact that many phrasal verbs serve double duty as idioms too. (see through, cough up, lean on)

    "sit on" is listed as a phrasal verb on this site.
    Interesting. To me, it's a verb-preposition combination that serves to take that which is abstract and speak of it in a concrete way.

    Yes, many verb-preposition combinations are phrasal verbs. The test for this is that the preposition, or adverb, has to change the meaning of the verb.

    take off - leave the ground - leave

    Without "off", "take" doesn't mean "leave the ground" or "leave".

    So that's a phrasal verb.

    Sit on "something". With or without "on", "sit" still means "sit". So to me, it's not a phrasal verb. Of course, there is a broader defininition of "phrasal verb" that some people, I think, might use. But that's just calling a phrase that includes a verb a "phrasal verb", and that's not quite the same thing as a verb + preposition or adverb. With one of these combinations the meaning of the verb does not remain the same. That's a phrasal verb. I have great respect for this site as an ESL-EFL resource, but, to me, "sit on" is not a phrasal verb.


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    #7

    Re: sit on cash

    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Are there any alternatives to sitting on their cash?

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    #8

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post

    Are there any alternatives to sitting on their cash?
    US or Australian shares/stocks look good at the moment.


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    #9

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by Daruma View Post
    Experts who work with the wealthy and observe their spending habits say rich folks are sitting on their cash.

    Are there any alternatives to sitting on their cash?
    You could say "holding off on spending": ... rich folks are holding off on spending.

    Here's another possibility: ... rich folks aren't in any hurry to spend their money.


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    #10

    Re: sit on cash

    Quote Originally Posted by 2006 View Post
    But many are, but even more interesting is the fact that many phrasal verbs serve double duty as idioms too. (see through, cough up, lean on)

    "sit on" is listed as a phrasal verb on this site.

    I've seen that "sit on" is listed as a phrasal verb in other references as well. However, if one is to use this definition as a guide, and I do, I would say that "sit on" is not a phrasal verb.

    ESL Glossary: Definitions of common ESL/EFL terms: phrasal verbs

    phrasal verbs: Verbs that are used in common with other parts of speech, usually prepositions, and take on meanings of their own when combined with these other parts of speech

    sit on - Although the combination of these two words are an expression, or an idiom, the meaning of "sit" itself" is not really affected, as I see it. The phrase "sit on" is figuratively, but one can observe that the meaning of "sit" is not affected.

    Going on the logic that "sit on" is a phrasal verb, one would have to say "sit through" is also a phrasal verb. However, "sit through" is a verb-preposition combination.

    We managed to sit through the entire show even though we thought it was very boring.

    sit through - remain seated for an extended length of time - That's what it means, but the meaning of "sit" is not affected.

    I would use this definition as a guide as well. phrasal verb

    The phrase "sit on" in and of itself is not a single semantic unit because, as I said before, "sit" still means "sit" in the phrase. Once again, going on the logic that "sit on" is a phrasal verb, one would have to say that "sit at" is also a phrasal verb. However, "sit at" is not a phrasal verb either. When we say someone is "sitting at" their computer, the meaning of "sit" does not change, just as the meaning of "sit" is not directly affected, or does not change, in the phrase "sit on". Therefore, we can say that "on" is part of a verb phrase, but "sit on" is not a phrasal verb. If one does not want to distinguish between a verb phrase and a phrasal verb, then that's another story.

    They're sitting on a bench. They're sitting on their money.

    In the example below, we can see how the meaning of "give" is affected because in the example sentence "give" does not simply mean "give". The combination of "give up" means "stop doing something" or "quit doing something".

    DefinitionA phrasal verb is a combination of a lexical verb and a verbal particle that forms a single semantic and syntactic unit.



    Example (English)The item give up is a phrasal verb, as in the following:
    • He gave up smoking.
    • He gave smoking up.
    Last edited by PROESL; 16-Sep-2009 at 15:57.

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