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  1. anupumh's Avatar
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    #1

    Smile Liquadated

    Hi,

    How can we use the term liquadated?

    The unit has got liquadated.

    (the unit of the factory has got closed)

    Is the above sentence appropriate?

    Thanks

  2. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: Liquadated

    Financial assets are either frozen (you can't spend them) or liquid (you can). When a company or person needs money, it/s/he liquidates something.

    In the present climate - and in many previous periods of financial difficulty - 'liquIdate' has been used as a euphemism for 'shut down', but what the word refers to is the raising of cash.

    b

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    #3

    Exclamation Re: Liquadated

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Financial assets are either frozen (you can't spend them) or liquid (you can). When a company or person needs money, it/s/he liquidates something.

    In the present climate - and in many previous periods of financial difficulty - 'liquIdate' has been used as a euphemism for 'shut down', but what the word refers to is the raising of cash.

    b
    The correct spelling is Liquidate which is a financial term having legal implications. It means winding up of a business firm by selling off its free (un-pledged) assets to convert them into cash to pay the firm's unsecured creditors. The secured creditors such as banks, lending financial institutions and employees having salary arrears take control of the respective pledged assets on obtaining liquidation orders from appropriate courts. Any remaining amount is distributed among the shareholders in proportion to their shareholdings. Liquidation process is initiated either by the shareholders (voluntary liquidation) or by the creditors after obtaining court's permission (compulsory liquidation).

    Example: In today's time of economic crisis, it is no wonder that a good number of companies are being forced to liquidate.
    Last edited by sarat_106; 16-Sep-2009 at 10:40.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: Liquadated

    Quote Originally Posted by sarat_106 View Post
    The correct spelling is Liquidate ...
    Was this addressed to me?
    which is a financial term having legal implications. It means winding up of a business firm by selling off its free (un-pledged) assets to convert them into cash to pay the firm's unsecured creditors. The secured creditors such as banks, lending financial institutions and employees having salary arrears take control of the respective pledged assets on obtaining liquidation orders from appropriate courts. Any remaining amount is distributed among the shareholders in proportion to their shareholdings. Liquidation process is initiated either by the shareholders (voluntary liquidation) or by the creditors after obtaining court's permission (compulsory liquidation).


    Example: In today's time of economic crisis, it is no wonder that a good number of companies are being forced to liquidate.
    Yes. The word has accumulated a lot of regulatory detritus, I thought it more helpful in this context - rather than ask a student to remember yet another sound/arbitrary meaning pair - to refer to an early 19th century meaning of 'liquid', 'Financial sense of "capable of being converted to cash" is first recorded 1818'; Online Etymology Dictionary

    b

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    #5

    Exclamation Re: Liquadated

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Yes. The word has accumulated a lot of regulatory detritus, I thought it more helpful in this context - rather than ask a student to remember yet another sound/arbitrary meaning pair - to refer to an early 19th century meaning of 'liquid', 'Financial sense of "capable of being converted to cash" is first recorded 1818'; Online Etymology Dictionary

    b
    Thank you Bobk. The mention of spelling mistake was not addressed to you, it was to point out the discripancy in the original post.

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