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  1. Gintonik
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    #1

    "unfold"

    I've read an article and this sentence was written in it: "A little girl sits in the audience and watches the beautiful music and story of the Nutcrackers unfold in front of her."

    My question is, why the word "unfold" doesn't have an "S"? Is it a verb? Is it a typo? Or an exception? Maybe some sort of fixed expression? Why not unfolding "unfolding" instead? I've been browsing the net for some time and I have seen both (with and without "S")... I am a bit confused about this so I would be glad if someone could tell me what this "unfold" is all about.

    Thank you in advance for your concern.

  2. anupumh's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by Gintonik View Post
    I've read an article and this sentence was written in it: "A little girl sits in the audience and watches the beautiful music and story of the Nutcrackers unfold in front of her."

    My question is, why the word "unfold" doesn't have an "S"? Is it a verb? Is it a typo? Or an exception? Maybe some sort of fixed expression? Why not unfolding "unfolding" instead? I've been browsing the net for some time and I have seen both (with and without "S")... I am a bit confused about this so I would be glad if someone could tell me what this "unfold" is all about.

    Thank you in advance for your concern.
    Yes unfold out here is a verb... unfold is plural and unfolds is the singular form.

    Why unfold the plural form is used?
    Because there are 2 different enteties which are unfolding, music and story of the nutcrackers.

    Why not unfolding?
    One can use unfolding as well, that will be the progressive form. Out here they have used unfold the simple present from.

    I hope my explanation helps. If I am wrong somewhere, would request some native teacher to correct me and provide a better explanation.

    Thanks

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    #3

    Re: "unfold"

    I am a student.

    "A little girl sits in the audience and watches the beautiful music and story of the Nutcrackers [that] unfold in front of her."

    Without saying the presence of relative pronoun is expected to be assumed. So here, it acts a verb for the subject 'the beautiful music and story'.

    Also, the progressive form 'unfolding' can be used but since the the total sentence is in present simple form, it is better to stick to use the word in present simple. Therefore, unfold is the better choice.

    Please correct me if I am wrong anywhere:)

  3. Raymott's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by Gintonik View Post
    I've read an article and this sentence was written in it: "A little girl sits in the audience and watches the beautiful music and story of the Nutcrackers unfold in front of her."

    My question is, why the word "unfold" doesn't have an "S"? Is it a verb? Is it a typo? Or an exception? Maybe some sort of fixed expression? Why not unfolding "unfolding" instead? I've been browsing the net for some time and I have seen both (with and without "S")... I am a bit confused about this so I would be glad if someone could tell me what this "unfold" is all about.

    Thank you in advance for your concern.
    A little girl watches the story unfold.
    This is normal, correct, and does not reflect a plural subject. It is still 'unfold' with only one subject, 'story'. Although 'story' is the subject of 'unfold', it is the object of the sentence.

    The form is the same, regardless of the main tense of the sentence.
    More examples:
    I saw the man take the money. (not 'takes')
    I had seen the man take the money.
    He has seen the policeman arrest a thief.

    In all these cases, the -ing form could be used.
    I saw the man taking the money.

    I might think of the grammatical explanation for this later, unless someone beats me to it.

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    #5

    Re: "unfold"

    When the verb is in 'ing' form, can we consider that the phrase starting with the 'ing' verb an adjectival phrase?

    Coming to the former point:

    It is interesting that, at many a place, I have come across that kind of grammatical structure, but never have I thought of questioning myself why?

    Thanks Raymott for that piece of knowledge.. :)

    So, eventhough a sentence is not in subjunctive mood, one can see verbs in plural form. This is an interesting point. Could you please let out the reason as to why the verb needs to be in plural form? Also are there any other scenarios in which verbs are used in plural forms?

    Thank you

    Kiran

  4. Raymott's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    When the verb is in 'ing' form, can we consider that the phrase starting with the 'ing' verb an adjectival phrase?

    Coming to the former point:

    It is interesting that, at many a place, I have come across that kind of grammatical structure, but never have I thought of questioning myself why?

    Thanks Raymott for that piece of knowledge.. :)

    So, eventhough a sentence is not in subjunctive mood, one can see verbs in plural form. This is an interesting point. Could you please let out the reason as to why the verb needs to be in plural form? Also are there any other scenarios in which verbs are used in plural forms?

    Thank you

    Kiran
    It's not in the plural form. It's in the bare infinitive.
    The verb is 'to unfold', or 'unfold'. Plurality has nothing to do with it.

    You don't call the verb in "I can speak English" plural, do you? I hope not. When a modal verb is used, it's followed by the bare infinitive. Plurals don't enter into it.
    Similarly with "I saw the girl dance".

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    #7

    Re: "unfold"

    Can we say 'I saw the girl to dance'? If so, the verb phrase 'to dance' is acting as an adjective?

    Thanks

  5. Raymott's Avatar
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    #8

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Can we say 'I saw the girl to dance'? If so, the verb phrase 'to dance' is acting as an adjective?

    Thanks
    No you can't say that.
    You can say: "
    "I asked the girl to dance" (Would you please dance, girl?)
    "I requested the girl to dance" (Would you please dance, girl?)
    "I told the girl to dance" (Dance, girl)
    "I ordered the girl to dance " "
    "I commanded the girl to dance " "
    "I expected
    the girl to dance" (I thought you were going to dance, girl).

  6. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #9

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    I am a student.

    "A little girl sits in the audience and watches the beautiful music and story of the Nutcrackers [that] unfold in front of her."

    Without saying the presence of relative pronoun is expected to be assumed. So here, it acts a verb for the subject 'the beautiful music and story'.

    Also, the progressive form 'unfolding' can be used but since the the total sentence is in present simple form, it is better to stick to use the word in present simple. Therefore, unfold is the better choice.

    Please correct me if I am wrong anywhere:)
    The relative pronoun is not implied or needed. She watches them unfold. Not, 'she watches them that unfold.'

  7. konungursvia's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "unfold"

    Quote Originally Posted by kiranlegend View Post
    Can we say 'I saw the girl to dance'? If so, the verb phrase 'to dance' is acting as an adjective?

    Thanks
    You could say "I saw the girl dancing," in which 'dancing' is a gerund.

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