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  1. Senior Member
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    #1

    paper

    can I say:
    some paper (without s)?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #2

    Re: paper

    Quote Originally Posted by sash2008 View Post
    can I say:
    some paper (without s)?
    Yes.

    Mass nouns, such as "soap" or "fruit" do not appear in the plural when they are used in their non-counted, non-discrete sense.

    You can't use a number adjective in front of words like this, so they don't form the plural. You can't say "I need five papers," for example. You have to say, "I need five pieces of paper."

    Here is a Wiki article on this topic
    Mass noun - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "PaperS" in the plural usually means something different from "paper."

    "Papers" refers to newspapers, or to other written articles (student assignments, perhaps, or scholarly articles published in professional journals, etc)

  2. Senior Member
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    #3

    Re: paper

    Thank you
    Yes. I agree.
    can I say :Here is some paper?


    • Join Date: Aug 2009
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    #4

    Re: paper

    Quote Originally Posted by sash2008 View Post
    Thank you
    Yes. I agree.
    can I say :Here is some paper?

    Absolutely.

    "Here is some paper."

    "I don't have any paper."

    "Do you want more paper?"

    "I wish I had enough paper."

    "You're wasting too much paper."

    "Here is some more paper."

    "Is there any more paper?"

    "You should have used less paper."

    "I don't think we'll buy very much more paper."

    These adjectives of quantity are not numerical, so they readily modify mass nouns. They quantify without enumerating. The quantification is RELATIVE rather than counted.

    More, less, some, some more, any, any more, too much, enough -- these are "adjectives of relative quantification" and they go with nouns like paper, fruit, chalk, water, soap, etc.

    Here's a famous comical dialog about the mass noun "tea."

    "Take some more tea," the March Hare said to Alice, very earnestly.
    "I've had nothing yet," Alice replied in an offended tone: "so I can't take more."
    "You mean you can't take less," said the Hatter: "it's very easy to take more than nothing."
    ~ Lewis Carroll (Alice in Wonderland)
    Last edited by Ann1977; 17-Sep-2009 at 01:26.

  3. Senior Member
    Interested in Language
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    • Posts: 519
    #5

    Re: paper

    Many thanks to you.

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